Glossary

  • A
  • This traditional African stitch closely resembles a DNA helix, hence the name African Helix. All the actual weaving is done by looping over the thread. This makes for a very flexible, comfy tube that is wonderful embellished or plain. How to Do African
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  • Sometimes you just don't want to connect elements with loops, but rather a simple hole with a jump ring. Once you’ve flattened an end of wire, it takes just an awl and hammer to put a hole through it. No drill necessary.
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  • B
  • This thick steel tool is a measuring device for both wire and metal sheet. B & S is short for Brown and Sharpe (also known as American Standard or American Wire Gauge) and is a universal system for finding the gauge, or thickness, of metal. The larger
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  • There are a lot of expensive, beautiful hammers out there, but an inexpensive ball peen hammer both flattens and it textures!
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  • This method is worked with a crochet hook. It forms a tidy chain along the edge. Place a slipknot on a Beaded crochet cord makes a great finish or a strap for other beadwork. Make an initial chain of four (or more) stitches. Leave a bead in each chain
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  • Embroidery involves sewing decorative stitches on fabric. Beads can be incorporated into any embroidery stitch. Backstitch (also known as return stitch and running stitch), buttonhole stitch, chain stitch, couching, cretan stitch, cross-stitch, feather
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  • Knitting one bead into one stitch is the technique to use for knitting charted designs. Insert the needle into the stitch to be knit as usual, slide the bead up against the needle, and pull the bead through to the front as you complete the stitch. Related
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  • The art of bead making utilizes a variety of talents and materials for one-of-a-kind designs. Find information on learning the art of lampworking, the process of transforming clay into beads, unique fabric beads and everything in-between. This section
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  • Begin by creating a foundation row in ladder stitch or using a secured thread. String one bead and pass under the closest exposed loop of the foundation row. Pass back through the same bead and continue, adding one bead at a time. To decrease within a
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  • C
  • Chain-nose pliers have smooth flat jaws that taper to a point. If you're in the market, make sure to buy ergonomically over economically! You'll have these in your hands all the time so make sure they're comfortable. Use them for bending wire
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  • String 1A and 1B six times; pass through them again to form a circle for the foundation round and pass through the next 1B. *String 1A, 1B, and 1A; skip 1B and pass through the following 1B in the previous round. Repeat from * twice, then step up for
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  • String the first round of beads and pass through them again to form a circle. Start a new round by stringing 2 beads; pass through the last bead of the first round and through the 2 beads just strung. Repeat all around, passing through the next bead of
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  • For times when all you need is a base row of a particular stitch to begin the piece, combining bead stitches is your answer. Learn how to start a project with a right angle weave and transform one row later to peyote stitch, or the other way around. Find
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  • Use cones to finish a multistrand piece. Attach each strand of beads to a wrapped loop or an eye pin. Use the wrapped-loop wire to string the wide end of a cone, covering the ends of the stringing material. Form a wrapped loop at the tip of the cone that
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  • String a crimp tube and pass through the connection finding. Pass back through the tube leaving a short tail. Use the back notch of crimping pliers to pinch the tube into a U, leaving a wire on each side of the bend. Rotate the tube 90° and use the
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  • Crimping pliers have jaws with two notches: one collapses the crimp tube, the other shapes it.
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  • D
  • Begin by stringing a small number of beads and forming a circle by passing through the first bead strung. String 1 bead and pass through the bead opposite the first bead of the circle, forming the "daisy." Related Free Article: Try This Unusual Daisy
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  • Learn great new ways to wear your favorite designs. Learn to experiment with fashion in mind with necklaces, brooches, earrings and more to add flair to everyday.
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  • E
  • Eye pins are straight wires that end in a loop. See head pins , simple loops
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  • F
  • Learn tips from our experts about building your findings stash. Look for detailed information on which metals to choose, and findings that are absolutely necessary to have.
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  • Begin with a foundation row of even-count ladder stitch. String 2 beads, pass down through the second to last bead in the ladder, and up through the next bead. String 2 beads, pass down the next bead and then up through the following. Repeat to the end
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  • The pointy jaws of this cutter are flat on one side, V-shaped on the other. When you cut wire with this tool, you'll end up with one wire piece that has a flat, or flush cut, and another that's angled. Again, when aiming for a professional look
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  • G
  • When you want to create your own beaded designs in loomwork, brick, peyote or square stitch, graph paper is handy to plan out your project.
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  • H
  • A head pin is a wire with a nail-like head, ball, or decoration on one end. Typically, the other end of the pin is made into a loop. Headpins are often used to create earrings or dangles for necklaces. Headpins may be purchased or you may create your
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  • J
  • Jump rings are circles of wire that are used to connect one object to another. You may purchase jump rings or you may create your own. Opening and closing jump rings To open a jump ring, grasp each side of its opening with a pair of pliers. Don't pull
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  • K
  • Knotting may be used in between beads to keep them from sliding on the thread, and will also keep them from spilling all over the place if the thread should ever break. Knotting may also be used to add decorative touches to a jewelry design or to simply
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  • L
  • Double-Needle Ladder Stitch Using two needles, one threaded on each end of the thread, pass one needle through one or more beads from left to right and pass the other needle through the same beads from right to left. Continue adding beads by crisscrossing
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  • Lampworking is a type of glasswork that uses a gas fueled torch to melt rods and tubes of clear and colored glass. Once in a molten state, the glass is formed by blowing and shaping with tools and hand movements. The possibilities for beads are endless
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  • Follow the manufacturer's instructions for warping your bead loom. Note that you will need one more warp thread than you have number of beads in a row. To weave the beads, tie a thread to an outside warp (tie onto the left warp if you are right-handed
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  • M
  • If your cutters are not the best, a metal file is indispensable for quickly smoothing out unevenness or sharp ends.
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  • Mini torches can be ideal for many jewelry projects, including drawing beads, fusing high-karat gold and fine silver, and torch-firing some enamels and precious metal clays. Although mini torches can be used for some smaller-project soldering, care needs
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  • Mixed media jewelry combines traditional jewelry-making techniques, such as stringing and wireworking, with crafting techniques you may never associate with jewelry. Think rubber stamping, sewing, collage, decoupage and wood burning. Find out why ‘cross
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  • N
  • Begin by stringing a base row of 13 beads. String 5 beads and go back through the fifth bead from the end of the base row. String another 5 beads, skip 3 beads of the base row, and go back through the next. Repeat to end of row. Passing through the fifth
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  • O
  • Get tips from organizational gurus on cleaning up and maintaining a functional studio.
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  • Several chemicals, including liver of sulfur, are used to darken, or patina, wire. See related free article: The ABCs of Oxidizing Jewelry Related books and magazines: Jewelry Artist Step by Step Wire Jewelry Wire Style by Denise Peck
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  • P
  • To pass through means to move your needle in the same direction that the beads have been strung. To pass back through means to move your needle in the opposite direction.
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  • To pass through means to move your needle in the same direction that the beads have been strung. To pass back through means to move your needle in the opposite direction.
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  • Peyote stitch is an off-loom beadweaving technique that is worked with either an even or odd number of beads per row. Both can be woven to create flat strips, as flat round shapes, spiral or in a tube design.
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  • The way you shoot beadwork photos is important, even if the results are used only to show off your work. If you are using these photographs to market your designs, good photos are especially important. Learn the tips and tricks for staging, lighting,
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  • Polymer clay is a beautiful medium that can be made into sensational-looking beads. Learn the tricks for handling and designing with this medium.
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  • Clay is a beautiful medium that can be made into sensational-looking beads. Learn the tricks for handling, setting and designing with this medium.
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  • Get tips from the experts on how to get your designs noticed and published. Tips include galleries, submitting to a magazine, and ways to sell your jewelry.
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  • R
  • Learn the ins and outs of resins and epoxy in creating beads.
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  • There are two types of right-angle weave that produce the same finished beadwork, but that use different thread paths. Learn why the double-needle technique is sometimes reffered to as ‘cross-needle weaving.’ Get how-tos on both techniques
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  • Even though these pliers really only do one thing—bend loops—they are invaluable for getting a professional look. Round-nose pliers have smooth cylindrical jaws that taper to a point and less likely to bend or become misaligned. You can make
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  • S
  • An “S” clasp is a simple, comfortable clasp that can be formed with a torch or torch-free. Using a butane torch to ball up the wire ends to form a clasp is a nice touch when using thin gauge (20–24) fine silver. But if you want to finish
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  • The maneuverability of the shorter "sharp" or "straw" needles is perfect for off-loom work.
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  • A pair of these little pointy, extremely sharp scissors is a key component to any off-loomer's toolbox, not only for cutting thread but also for getting into tight trim spots for bead embroidery.
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  • Bead shows can be overwhelming, but with these tips, you can shop with confidence and with a budget, or at least a plan.
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  • Join Lisa from Beaducation as she teaches the fundamentals of this basic jewelry-making skill. This class reviews what tools to use and how to make even, consistent loops every time.
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  • String 4 size 8° and 5 size 11° beads. Pass through the size 8° beads again. *String 1 size 8° and 5 size 11° beads. Pass through the last three size 8°s and the size 8° just strung. Repeat from * until you reach the desired
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  • Begin by stringing a row of beads. For the second row, string 2 beads, pass through the second-to-last bead of the first row, and back through the second bead of those just strung. Continue by stringing 1 bead, passing through the third-to-last bead of
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  • The unusual and striking pattern makes this stitch a delightful break from routine. With practice, watch it turn into a beautiful fringed lariat or a classic V-shape.
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  • Stringing is a technique in which you use a beading wire, needle and thread, or other material to gather beads into a strand. Popular stringing materials include beading wire, braided thread, elastic cord, fiber cord, leather cord, nylon thread, silk
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  • T
  • A tension bead (or stopper bead) holds your work in place. To make one, string a bead larger than those you are working with, then pass through the bead one or more times, making sure not to split your thread. The bead will be able to slide along, but
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  • Thread is one option for stringing material. Popular types include braided thread, nylon thread, pearl cotton, quilting thread, and silk thread. Thread will often need to be conditioned with a wax or conditioner before use to protect it from fraying and
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  • This little tool was originally designed for sculpting wax molds, but beaders found a great use for it. The tip has a tiny heat element that works perfect for cleanly trimming thread close to beadwork.
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  • String 3 beads and tie them in a circle to form a triangle. This is your first unit. Pass through the first bead again. String 2 beads and pass through the bead just exited and the 2 just strung. Continue adding 2 beads at a time to make a series of triangles
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  • Begin with a foundation row of ladder stitch. Join the ends together to form a tube. String 2 beads. Pass down through the next bead and up through the bead after it. Repeat around the tube. At the end of the round, pass through the first beads of the
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  • W
  • Wrapped-loop bails turn side-drilled beads, usually teardrops or briolettes, into pendants. Center the bead on a 3" or longer piece of wire. Bend both ends of the wire up the sides and across the top of the bead. Bend one end straight up at the center
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  • COIL To make a coil , use one hand to hold the end of your wire against a mandrel. With the other hand, wrap the wire around the mandrel in tight loops. To remove the coil, slide it off the mandrel and cut. Add vertical loops on either end to use the
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  • It's good to have a pair of wire cutters used solely for cutting flexible beading wire—the steel is murder on blades. You can buy a cutters strictly designed for cutting steel and other blade-denting metals or do like me and employ one of your
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  • Learn how to make open and closed loop spirals and the proper tools to use for mastering this technique. Watch as Lisa from Beaducation.com shows you how to make one of her favorite shapes to incorporate into many or your designs.
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  • Wire is a versatile jewelry design element that may be used to connect chain or beaded links, to embellish beads, to hang pendants, or create a number of elements like head pins, eye pins, ear wires, bails, pin backs, ring shanks, clasps, or just about
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  • WIRE-WRAPPED LOOP For a wire-wrapped loop , cut the desired length of wire and make a 90? bend 2" from one end. Use round-nose pliers to hold the wire near the angle and bend the short end up and around the pliers until it meets itself. Wrap the wire
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