The best alternatives to Fireline

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KipperCat wrote
on Oct 28, 2010 2:01 PM

Easy comment first - if a project needs the drape of Nymo, but you don't like to use it, try OneG.  It can be split like Nymo, but it's rare.  Usually I can get through a project easily without it splitting.  If I undo my stitching several times, it will start to fray, but again - not nearly as bad as Nymo.

Like I said, I've never tried heat-conditioning Nymo, so am only repeating what others have told me.  The heat allows the wax to penetrate the Nymo. The simplest method I've read is to thread several needles ahead of time and set them in a sunny windowsill.  Of course, this depends on your climate.  One woman runs her waxed thread over a light bulb for the heat.  Others have mentioned using a curling iron.  One woman keeps her block of beeswax in her bra to start the heating process.

I've been working from one of DF's books lately. I'll find it later and double check what it says.

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on Nov 10, 2010 7:34 AM

Just added another thread to the list surfing the forum...Confused

KipperCat, if you have "Beading with brick stitch" by Diane Fitzgerald you can find that info under Tools and techniques - Thread. She talks about the difference between spool and bobbin thread and I assumed that she doesn't purchase Nymo in bobbins!

By the way I've tried to heat Nymo and I must admit that it works better! Thanks for your tip! Wink

The Garden of

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KipperCat wrote
on Nov 10, 2010 9:05 AM

Which method did you use to heat your Nymo?  I have a couple of Nymo bobbins left that I'd like to use up.

The only Fitzgerald book I have is Shaped Beadwork - dimensional jewelry with peyote stitch.  There she says her favorite thread is Nymo D on the bobbin, which she uses doubled, and waxed so that the two strands stick together.  I've tried working with doubled thread a couple of times

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on Nov 11, 2010 5:15 AM

I put a piece of thread in the microwave for a few seconds! Don't worry: the thread doesn't catch fire! Big Smile

The Garden of

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KipperCat wrote
on Nov 11, 2010 10:16 AM

Ooh, I like that!  I tried waxing a piece of SoNo and running around a light bulb, but it didn't seem to help - perhaps because SoNo is designed to not need any waxing.  It also wasn't nearly as easy as the microwave.

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Ms. Peltzer wrote
on Sep 27, 2012 4:51 PM

Wildfire isn't an alternative-I've used 100 meters and the outer layer breaks if bent, exposing the center core, and god help you if you use that bit--it will break for sure some hours of wear down the line.  No problem if you never make mistakes, and if you have a big-eye beading needle, because Wildfire is flat and wide and almost impossible to get through a size 12 Indian or John James beading needle. I was so glad when my second reel ran out, I've gone through multiple 300 yard reels of Fireline since.   I don't think there is anything as good as Fireline for beading with crystals and seed beads.  Listing inferior products is not actually a list of alternatives to Fireline.

Having said that, I'd like to know who made the 6lb test the standard and why.  How do the 3lb and 4lb test hold up in the same projects?  Can you thread a size 11 beading needle with 8lb or 10lb or go through 11/0 and 15/0 seed beads multiple times with them?  Who has tried these alternatives to 6lb and what is your opinion?

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SEllen 2 wrote
on Sep 28, 2012 1:23 PM

Ms.P

I generally use Fireline in 4#, 6# & 8# test. I have used Fireline in, I think the 2# test, but I keep coming back to the 4, 6, & 8. For me it just depends on what beads I'm using, If I'm using mostly seeds in an off loom piece. Or if I'm using a mix of seeds and larger glass beads or gemstones. Or if I'm doing a bead embroidery piece.(Yes, I do sometimes use Fireline for that too.)

The 4 & 6 I tend to use with mostly seed beads that will need to be passed through numerous times. Like in a piece that is heavily embellished or that is multiple componants stitched together.

The 8 I use in pieces that only need to be passed through a couple of times. Like in a basic stitched bracelet. But, I'm one of those that likes to go through more than once anyway just to make sure if one thread breaks theres a back up. So, generally I go through everything at least twice. The 8 is where, for me it gets hard to thread. So, I haven't used anything over the 8.

 But like with most beading materials it really is a personal preferance. I know some beaders who would never use anything smaller than the 6#. And like the originator of this thread I know some beaders who don't like to use Fireline at all. But variety makes life more fun...don't you think.Big Smile

I hope this has been of some help.

 sellen Smile

southwest Texas USA

 

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Beadiecat wrote
on Sep 29, 2012 3:07 AM

I have threaded a size 13 needle with 8lb test, and it will go through a size 15 seed bead two or three times, but not much more than that.

Cat

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beadinstyle wrote
on Sep 29, 2012 5:15 PM

NicoleT24:

Unfortunately, I think we are going to have to wait until a company decides to make braided line that appeals to us beaders rather than Bass and Trout. 

Still laughing Nicole.  What are they thinking?

I use Fireline, and find that the two colours seem sufficient. Never woulda thought it. I would like more drape, but I LURV the way it (usually) UN-knots. Big Smile  I use the heavier PowerPro for knotting  pearls sometimes, but I don't like it for weaving.  As for the lighter threads like Nymo ... weelll, no thanks. Too much trouble. 

Ruth

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ottercat wrote
on Sep 30, 2012 5:55 AM

What problems have you had with Nymo thread?  I use Nymo thread for bead weaving.  Usually the 'OO' for the smaller seed beads because I go thru the beads several times.  Currently working on a cuff using non-uniform size 11 glass seed beads and size 'O' black Nymo thread; designing-on-the-fly with this one.  I may consider using Fireline for a pouch -- for strength.  How well does Fireline adapt to bead weaving (several passes thru the beads)?  What's the smallest size of seed bead that would work with what size Fireline for bead weaving.  Thanks for sharing your experiences -- especially with someone who's never used anything else but Nymo.  Again, thanks.

Ottercat Coffee

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Be yourself.  Everyone else is already taken.  ~ Oscar Wilde

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SCB1 wrote
on Sep 30, 2012 9:25 AM

I make all my woven items, (off loom) with Fireline. I make several passes with all of the Fireline.   I use #4 for seed beads and firepolished, #6  whenever I incorporate crystals into the piece, and #8 pound when I use any beads when I need a stiff form.   

The reason that I don't like Nymo is that it doesn't seem to hold up well over time. I have made many items when I first started and I have to repair most of them. Not from people being hard on the piece, because some of the items have never been worn by a person. The knots seems to be able to work their way out of some of the pieces, and that never happens with Fireline.   Also I really hate the fraying of Nymo. I used to cut and file the ends of my needles to keep the fraying to a minimum, that worked to a degree, but it is much easier to just use the Fireline. 

Some people will tell you that because Fireline is made for fishing that it has to have a breakdown factor when exposed to light and air. That is a myth, I made a peyote piece that has hung in a west window for the past 4 years, It is a piece I made as a gift to our Priest. I just checked the condition of it the other day, and found it to be still stable and not ready to fall apart. However a piece made with Nymo, under the same conditions, would already have to had repairs to it.

For these reasons I am a huge Fireline fan.

 

Happy Beading!!

Happy Beading!!

Sue,

Small-town USA. 

Michigan.

 

 

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ottercat wrote
on Oct 2, 2012 6:58 AM

Thanks SCB1,

I'll have to get some Fireline and experiment with it (doing 90DOL stitch).  My 'Winter Tree' is done with 'OO' beige Nymo -- so far so good (completed April 2006); as is all of my pieces.  I'm planning a set of pouches (potable pockets) which would require added strength; Fireline might be the key.  Thank you.

I've wanted to thank you for your assistance -- you're an asset to this place.  Thanks Big Smile!

Ottercat Coffee

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Be yourself.  Everyone else is already taken.  ~ Oscar Wilde

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SCB1 wrote
on Oct 2, 2012 8:47 AM

ottercat:
I've wanted to thank you for your assistance -- you're an asset to this place.  Thanks Big Smile!

Thanks you for your kind words. It's people like you that make it worth wild to come here everyday and try to help a fellow beader in some little way. 

Happy Beading!!

Happy Beading!!

Sue,

Small-town USA. 

Michigan.

 

 

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beadedrose wrote
on Oct 2, 2012 10:37 AM

I only do beadweaving with seed beads & I use both Nymo 0 on the cone and fireline  #6. I found there is a big difference between the nymo on the spool and the nymo on the cone.

I haven't had too many problems with the nymo breaking as I go through the beads more than once & I really like the soft drape it gives in neclaces.  I love the fireline for beading around cabochons, I find the fireline much stronger & holds it's shape better. I have gone through sz 11 beads 4 times with the fireline.

Diane

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D.M.Z wrote
on Oct 2, 2012 5:22 PM

Even though this thread started two years ago..........it has been very interesting overall. I use both Nymo and Fireline, don't like Wildfire particularly but have found uses for it (when needing thicker material, and stiffness for instance). Wildfire in the smoke is NOT on my "A" list.....hate it because of the flaking, but the crystal is ok.

It amazes me that such good beaders as have responded here can howl about Nymo frizzling and shredding, for me to get my Nymo to do that (and it has happened) I have to unbead a large section of work, then it starts to separate and no amount of waxing fixes that. I work with looooong pieces of Nymo and Fireline both, min. of 2+ yards as that is as much as I can work without having to pull the thread twice to get it through (short arms?) and find little problems with either. I wonder if heating it causes it to frizz out? Both Nymo and Fireline are "fused" and maybe warming them up weakens the stuff that Nymo is bonded with.........

I love square stitch which means many passes (usually 4 or 5) through each bead and I rarely have problems with piercing the previous stitching, probably because of the way I hold my work and the angle that I hold my needle. One previous post here talked about people losing silver lining off beads......omg what were they doing to those beads. The needle should go through the bead hole, not scrape the inside. But there I am happy as a clam with both Nymo and Fireline. I have colors of Nymo on bobbins and usually use them doubled, Nymo on the big cones, all of which are "D" and Fireline in 4#, 6# and 8# in crystal, smaller spool of Fireline smoke in 6# and 6# Fireline in Neon Green..........lifetime supply of that!! For my looming, I warp the loom with 6# Fireline and use "D" Nymo for the weft unless the piece needs to practically stand on it's own. Also, I normally use size 10 or 11 needles, John James or Tulip and can thread anything I own through them. If I have to move down to a thinner needle I do, but doesn't happen too often.

This thread rocks!! Donna

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