The best alternatives to Fireline

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on Oct 4, 2010 7:19 AM

Hi there.

I'm looking for a nylon braided thread different from Fireline 6 lb but efficient as well. Do you have any suggestion? That would be a great idea to write a list of all the alternatives.

Thanks

List:

- Fireline

- Power Pro

- Wildfire

- Spiderline

The Garden of

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wmweeza wrote
on Oct 4, 2010 12:53 PM

This is a great idea, and I hope others can fill in because I know nothing about the different types!

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Pam I am wrote
on Oct 5, 2010 2:37 AM

Why do you want an alternative to Fireline?

Pam

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Posts 42
on Oct 5, 2010 5:18 AM

Because sometimes there are products less known but less expensive and equally good. Please tell your experience (positive or negative) so that I can update the list. This is helpful for everyone will read this discussion.

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Gyspy Mary wrote
on Oct 6, 2010 11:49 AM

I am a Bead Weaver, so the cost to use "Fireline" is minimal to the number of hours I work on a piece. So, I prefer to use the best I can find.

I have used a number of other materials, and Nothing stands the test of  Fireline. I sell to all age groups and the "Stress Test" of some of the younger generations, Fireline Is my choice.

I use lighter weight for Amulet Bags, because I like the flexibility of the lighter weight.

I have only been a serious Bead Weaver for 4-5 years.

Others who have more expertise, might differ.

Interesting topic:)

Gyspy Mary

Blessed are those who can Give, without remembering

and Take with out Forgetting

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SCB1 wrote
on Oct 6, 2010 8:23 PM

Mary my opinion goes right alone with yours. I hate to made a piece and spend many hours on it for it just to fall apart in a very short period of time.

As far a the few color choices for the Fireline, I have a solution for that. You can color the crystal Fireline with permanent color markers. The markers come in a very large color range from any art store. You just take the Fireline and put it between a couple of sheets of paper towel and the tip of the marker and pull the thread though the space. You will have a nicely colored thread that is strong durable and the color you need for your design. Easy!!!

Happy Beading!!

Sue,

Small-town USA. 

Michigan.

 

 

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NicoleT24 wrote
on Oct 7, 2010 7:58 AM

Hmmm, I've never found anything comparable to Fireline. My exhusband (an AVID fisherman) pointed me to a few other companies that make a braided nylon fishing line, but the colors were so odd (hot pink, lime green, etc, and no crystal or smoke colors) that they weren't even worth trying. And the cost wasn't really any better either.

Unfortunately, I think we are going to have to wait until a company decides to make braided line that appeals to us beaders rather than Bass and Trout. LOL. Until then, I honestly don't have any problem with the limited color selection of the Berkley products. I've found that pretty much every project I do the smoke or crystal are suitable. I've never found the need to hand-color the thread (and Sharpie markers do work). I do wish Fireline was less expensive... but it doesn't stop me from buying it. Like someone else mentioned... the cost of line per piece isn't really a deal breaker when I go to sell it.

 

 

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TreasureW wrote
on Oct 7, 2010 11:42 AM

I'm with everyone else on this one. There is no real alternative to Fireline, and I do think the quality and security of the finished piece easily justifies the cost (but don't tell the makers that, or they'll put the price up more haha....ok so I'm cynical in my old age)

Teresa

Norwich, UK

 

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LisaKwaj wrote
on Oct 8, 2010 12:07 PM

Hi, Daisy, welcome to the forum!  There's a braided thread sometimes used called Power Pro, and I have a spool, but I've only used it once.  It seemed to me that it frayed more easily than Fireline, and it was a whiter white than Fireline's crystal.  The crystal color seems to disappear into the fabric of the beadwork better.  BUT, I've only used it that one time.  I know there are beaders who swear by it, and I've read patterns that specify it.  You'll have to check for pricing, I'm afraid I don't remember how much it costs, but I'll bet it's comparable to Fireline.

I have to agree with everyone else that Fireline is a superior product.  PLUS, it seems to be the gold standard these days when we want a super-strong thread.  It comes in several weights, so you can get the degree of drapability you want.  And yes, you can color it with permanent markers.  To save a few bucks, buy the jumbo-size 300 yard spool from one of the sporting goods stores, it should run you around $30.

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Posts 42
on Oct 8, 2010 1:31 PM

Thanks everybody for your answers! Smile I understand that Fireline is an excellent product and probably unequaled, but I really want to hunt out a line that resemble it. I've added also Wildfire, if someone gave it a try...

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Billy Z wrote
on Oct 10, 2010 11:11 AM

We have some 5lb test Power Pro as well and it seems about the same as the 6lb test Fireline to me. However, I am not a bead weaver, so I don't know what the differences may be. The only difference that I can really tell is what they are made of. Fireline is traditional monofil line that is braided, heat-sealed, then coated, while the Power Pro is made of "Spectra Fiber", but is also braided, heat-sealed, and coated. I'm not sure what this "Spectra Fiber" is because it is one of those trade secrets, ya know. The Power Pro is a little cheaper in price, but not by much and as far as I can see, that few cents is really negligible in the big picture. We also have some Wildfire, but I refuse to give any kind of review or information on that due to my total disgust with Beadalon wire products and the way that they do business and treat their customers. But that's another story altogether. *laughz*

Billy ;o)

 I yam wut I yam and dats all wut I yam. ~Popeye~

Dragonfly Jewelry Designs - ArtFire Artisan Studio

 

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KipperCat wrote
on Oct 11, 2010 9:36 PM

I really like One-G beading thread by Toho.  It's less expensive than FireLine, but an entirely different type of product.  The advantage/disadvantage is that it comes in colors.  I love having a color that coordinates with my beads, but that means keeping several spools of thread around.  If you only use FireLine, there are only 2 colors to buy.

Regarding the use of a marker to color the FireLine  - I read somewhere the suggestion to take the marker and fill in any thread that shows after the piece is finished.  That seemed way too fussy for me.  Somehow I never realized that you could color the thread BEFORE using.  Duh!

I've used SoNo beading thread for a few projects with no problem.  Last weekend I worked on an Ndebele herringbone bracelet in size 11 beads.  With the beads at that angle, I found I could split that thread like Nymo.

Top 500 Contributor
Posts 42
on Oct 21, 2010 8:27 AM

Hi. I've removed the chart since it was almost empty. If you want to share your opinion, you'll be welcome and if I'll have enough useful data, I'll decide if to publish again the table.

Thanks for your cooperation

The Garden of

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TreasureW wrote
on Oct 22, 2010 3:55 PM

I'm currently trying a thread called KO, which is slightly better than Nymo, in that it seems to be lightly coated, so it doesn't split and fray as easily as Nymo, and seems a little stronger. I am pleased with it, and it's a lot lot lot cheaper than fireline, but really not a patch on it.

I made a RAW cuff with it the first time, using some cube beads, and unfortunately, just as I was finally fastening off one end, a cube cut through the thread at the other and it fell apart. *sigh*, but that was the bead, not the thread quality.  KO comes in a lot of colours, so for some projects I will use it. It's great for cellini spirals, as they are stiff as they are. I haven' t tried fireline on cellini.

KO seems to be a good alternative if you're out of Fireline Big Smile

Teresa

Norwich, UK

 

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KipperCat wrote
on Oct 22, 2010 4:10 PM

My friend who tried WildFire as a replacement for FireLine is disappointed in it.  It has a tendency to unravel when subjected to repeated use, something that FireLine can stand up to.   Of course, if we were sure we would never make a mistake and need to undo our stitches, that wouldn't be a problem. Devil

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