What's been your success w/ jewelry selling?

This post has 50 Replies | 8 Followers rated by 2 users
Top 500 Contributor
Posts 33
Kmarie0218 wrote
on Feb 7, 2010 8:54 PM

Thanks all for sharing your ideas and success stories!  I thought I was going to hit the jackpot at work when my company mandated the wearing of id badges at all times.  I did make and sell several of them so it was good....but not as much as I had hoped.

I usually sell my jewelry along with a couple other friends who bead.  We've done craft fairs, a few events/expos, but what usually works the best is in-home shows.  With craft fairs you can easily have a lot of competition, and shoppers who just pass by the table not interested in jewelry.  With an in-home show people are coming specifically for jewelry.  We haven't had an in-home show in quite a while tho.  We've kinda tapped out our circle of friends, etc.  One event we usually are lucky to do annually is a synchronized swim meet.  We donate 10% of the sales back to the swim team, and we've found that moms waiting for their daughters to compete, etc. are a pretty captive audience!   Every other year the school gets to hold Regional competitions, which brings in more out of town people.  Several of them have come up to us saying "I was hoping you ladies would be here!" and we're happy to see them, too!

I do have some of my jewelry at the salon where I get my hair done.  For some reason this time nothing has sold!  I had to remove it for a while when my hairdresser decided to become a Lia Sophia (boo!) rep.  She's since quit, thus why I was able to put my jewelry back there again.

I also have some of my jewelry available online through an Ecrater store.  I have sold 2 bracelets there and that's it.  Rather disappointing! 

It's hard to say what sells best.  It's really the demographic, and the mood of the customers.  Some events we'll sell a ton of bracelets, and others more necklaces.  My one friend makes very cool chandelier earrings with crystals and those tend to sell like hotcakes, especially among the teenage girls.

We displayed our jewelry at a dress exchange in Fall and that was an absolute bust, especially for me.  I sold nothing, my friend with the earrings sold maybe $50 (she almost always outsells me too).  I think it was very poorly advertised and I'm kinda hoping that they won't ask us back because we will have to say no!  Unless they do something to change their setup and marketing strategy.  But you never know unless you try...and we did make a connection from the experience too so we're hoping to get more opportunities from her.  So I guess I don't consider it a total bust afterall.

Not Ranked
Posts 23
on Feb 7, 2010 10:46 PM

I have been an artisan since 1966.I have watched alot of stuff come asnd go.Right now. my prices are all over the place. AVERage for an amulet bag %50. But I have stuff in the hundreds, too, and $10 earrings.

I BELIEVE MORE IN PRICINGHave a style that is yours and not to be shy about tooting your own horn,\. MY THINGS AS TO WHAT THEY ARE REALLY WOIRTH, THAN "REASONABLE..  i , personally think it is a foolish game to "seel short" out of despeeration, when doing shows,  etc. Although, right now I am liquidating all current stock due to a terrifying illness, at sacrifice prices.

What I have learned over the yers, is to keep going, I have to turn a proifit high enough to see this happen. Nother thing I have learned is to be unique in some way.

Not Ranked
Posts 1
janiecm wrote
on Mar 26, 2010 7:28 PM

I have sold jewelry I've made to co-workers, small craft and flea markets held by our local schools, and also to a few local stores which cater to mostly teens. I sold alot of memory wire bracelets to the stores, and bracelets, eyeglass holders and book marks at the school flea markets. 

jane

Top 500 Contributor
Posts 61
Alilou wrote
on Mar 26, 2010 7:55 PM

Just thought I'd put my 2 cents worth in here cos it's a subject close to my heart.

I sell the majority of my stuff at markets.  Most of the bracelets I do are in the $20-$30 bracket, same for necklaces.  Earrings anywhere from 10 to 25 dollars.  I do have more expensive pieces too.  I sell a lot (and I mean a lot!) of bag charms and bookmarks. Regardless of the price, if someone really likes something you've made, they'll buy it.  Bag charms with novelty tags are a winner for me - tags like "over it", "best friends" etc etc - and make them pretty too.

It all takes time...and if we had a crystal ball we'd all be millionaires as no-one can predict the market.

You might be interested to read the replies I got to my post "What am I doing wrong?" .  I took a lot of the advice I got there and it's paying off.  Literally.

Good luck.

Top 100 Contributor
Posts 244
Nemeton wrote
on Apr 26, 2010 4:37 AM

I started out selling at fairs, with variable success - then moved 'sideways' into selling patterns to magazines as my bigger and more expensive jewellery just didn't sell. Then a couple of years ago I had an operation and couldn't do fairs for a while, so opened an Etsy store just so that I had an outlet. For a while my bigger pieces were selling... then came the credit crunch and I had to reinvent myself as a seller of mainly kits and tutorials instead. Thankfully this seems to be working, and meantime I am trying to keep up the momentum with publications and new designs, and am always on the lookout for new ways to promote my beadwork!

Still the best piece of advice I was ever given: 'People buy things from people they like.' Customer service and a friendly attitude are more important than your pricing formula!

It does all take time but if you stick at it and keep chipping away, keep doing some little thing every single day to move your beading and your business forward, eventually all those little things will have an effect and move you towards where you were going!

Lynn

 

My website: http://lynndavybeadwork.co.uk/

 

 

Not Ranked
Posts 1
allanweary wrote
on Apr 29, 2010 5:14 AM

I think that many tips of selling jewelery.  And you sell all of jewelery item like Ring, Necklace.You can do it with information on jewelry home parties, photographing and scanning jewelry, creative jewelry sales, making your own jewelry tags and earring cards, setting up and maintaining your own successful jewelry website, cheap jewelry display ideas, professional looking jewelry packaging, consigning and wholesaling jewelry to shops and galleries, handling taxes, permits and other business matters, and more. I know that you sell in the $50 range. I think that you should try the best.

GlassOfVenice

 

 

Top 500 Contributor
Posts 26
SusanLesar wrote
on Jun 9, 2010 1:38 PM

My biggest seller this year has been Angel pins i make and sell for $15.00 each.  I have tried ebay and ETSY but got the best results by joining a neighborhood Art Gallery, most galleries have gift shops.  In fact I am going to join a couple more.

 

Susan

A friend is a gift you give yourself.

Top 500 Contributor
Posts 54
Sagewolf wrote
on Jun 9, 2010 4:50 PM

Vanbeads-

How did you make your display boards?  I can see how ordering premade ones would get expensive in a hurry.

Top 200 Contributor
Posts 97
Delia Stone wrote
on Jul 5, 2010 9:51 PM

TessM@7:

 Hi All -- such interesting info, thanks for sharing!  I've noticed that quite a few of the forum "regulars" have online shops like Etsy & Artfire, etc.  I've been selling only locally through a consignment shop with 3 locations - but toying with the idea of setting up for online sales.  Do you find that you sell more online vs. local shows or shops? 

~ Tess ~

Tess,
  This is a good question.   I have multiple shops on the internet;  My own website DeliaStone.com,  a web shop on Etsy and Bonanzle as well as a couple of other sites where I consign tutorials.  I also have multiple blogs (not very well maintained) and articles on info sites etc that point back to me which gives me pretty decent web exposure.  I sell more tutorials online than anything else.  Ironically I find that my number one market online - not really by design - is other jewlery makers.  Seriously.

  I also do shows in the southeast within about a 3 hour radius of my home.  Spring and Fall are great for me but in the Summer it's just too hot and humid in Florida for people want to spend too much time outdoors that doesn't include a beach or pool so there are no shows to speak of.  However, my sales at shows account for about 85% of my annual jewelry income.  I sell FAR more jewlery at shows.  I recommend this avenue to anyone who is serious about creating and selling jewelry.  It requires a small up front investment but it pays off.  If you take this route, accepting credit cards is a MUST.  The small business crafer can get a credit card service for about $60 a year through propay. 

   Your first show may or may not be a sucess but if you keep at it you will be glad you did.  Start at smaller, indoor shows if possible.  And remember that a show is not just an opportunity to sell, it's an opportunity to *learn*.  Pay attention to other booths, their set ups, their displays.  Talk to other vendors about other shows, etc.  Many are happy to share information.  You'll get valuable feedback from your customers.  You'll also get valuable experience that you can apply toward your sucess in the future too. 

  Selling at show has, for me at least, been the best way to sell my goods.

Delia Stone
Artisan Jewlery and Tutorials
http://www.DeliaStone.com

 

 

Top 50 Contributor
Posts 798
brightcircle wrote
on Jul 6, 2010 9:58 AM

I'm glad shows have worked so well for you, Delia.

All I can do is share my experience. I've done at least 6 shows from various promoters, and at not a single one of them did I make much more than what I paid for the booth fee alone, never mind my time, displays, gas, tables etc. At least half of them saw me leaving at the end of the day having made FAR LESS money than I paid for the booth. And this was after lots of research as to how best to do a show. Even though I would have a big stress meltdown before every show, I kept trying and kept trying, hoping that the next show would be better. Even taking credit cards, it never did. I made exactly ONE credit card sale--for $6.

After my last disastrous show, I realized I hated shows and I never want to do another one again. I MAY do home parties; that at least doesn't cost money upfront.


Handmade jewelry, beaded beads and more available at my NEW location, bonanza.com/booths/BrightCircle

Top 200 Contributor
Posts 97
Delia Stone wrote
on Jul 6, 2010 11:15 AM

brightcircle:

I'm glad shows have worked so well for you, Delia.

All I can do is share my experience. I've done at least 6 shows from various promoters, and at not a single one of them did I make much more than what I paid for the booth fee alone ...   I kept trying and kept trying, hoping that the next show would be better.

After my last disastrous show, I realized I hated shows and I never want to do another one again. I MAY do home parties; that at least doesn't cost money upfront.

Wow, that really sucks.  The first thing I would think you need to do is evaluate the type of shows you are applying to.  Are they juried?  Do they limit the number of exhibitors in each category so that it's not 60% jewlery?  Are they established - more than 5 years consecutive?  How are they promoted?  Are they indoor or outdoors?  Are they smaller craft shows,  or arts and craft shows?  Do they allow buy/sell vendors or do they require (and ENFORCE) handmade only?  These are all important factors in choosing a show.  Also if the main attraction is a car show or kiddie carnival and the vendors are a side attraction, forget it!

The shows I do are generally outdoors.  Very rarely do I do a show indoors.  This might make the difference?  The only indoor shows that I have done indoors were not big profit makers.  I think the last one I did was in the neighborhood of $200 - before expenses.  I really haven't much messed with indoor shows since then.  I prefer outdoor shows and do them as much as possible.  That's where the money is at for me but the difference could have to do with the type of shows and the market where you're at vs where I'm at.  Where are you at, btw? What area of the country?

 

Delia Stone
Artisan Jewlery and Tutorials
http://www.DeliaStone.com

 

 

Top 200 Contributor
Posts 97
Delia Stone wrote
on Jul 6, 2010 11:20 AM

Oh yes, and by far earrings are my biggest sellers!  I have them from the low end ($15) up to the high end ($139) but the midrange ($35 to $65) sell the best.  I did a show up in Alabama in the spring where I nearly sold out of earrings the first day!  And I had about 45 pair on the table. They never even looked at the $15 earrings - they went for the good stuff.   I ended up staying up until 2 a.m. in the hotel that night making more earrings for the next day! 

Delia Stone
Artisan Jewlery and Tutorials
http://www.DeliaStone.com

 

 

Top 200 Contributor
Posts 97
Delia Stone wrote
on Jul 6, 2010 11:27 AM

Nemeton:

It does all take time but if you stick at it and keep chipping away, keep doing some little thing every single day to move your beading and your business forward, eventually all those little things will have an effect and move you towards where you were going!

I am in another forum that has a thread that I am participating in called the 'July (or insert month) Item per day" thread.  The idea is for each participant to journal at least one thing each day that they have done towards buidling/maintaining their jewlery business.  It helps us to stay focused and (gently) holds us accountable knowing that others are watching to see what you're doing each day.  It has been a good exercise for me ... one thing I learned in tracking my jewelry related activities is that I'm doing more on a daily basis than I thought I was - which is good!

Not only do you get to see what YOU'RE doing, but seeing what others are doing gives you some perspective on what you're NOT doing that is crucial to advancing your business and what you need to be doing - which is very valuable information.

Maybe it would be a good idea to start a thread like that here .... if anyone is interested?

Delia Stone
Artisan Jewlery and Tutorials
http://www.DeliaStone.com

 

 

Top 10 Contributor
Posts 5,471
ForumModerator
JSmaz wrote
on Jul 6, 2010 12:27 PM

That's actually not a bad idea Delia.  I'd be interested.

Jeni

Oklahoma City

ArtFire Studio & blog  |  Gallery 

 

 

Top 50 Contributor
Posts 798
brightcircle wrote
on Jul 6, 2010 3:06 PM

Delia, I don't really know what they'd call themselves. All but one of them was free admission, indoor and outdoor was about half and half, one or two were juried. I'm pretty sure that none of them allowed buy/sell vendors, but not all of them enforced it (oddly enough, the show I did the best at, which was still not very good).

For religious reasons, I can not do shows that go over a Sunday, and no, I don't have any friends who could booth-sit for me on a second day. I know of only ONE juried show that does not go over a Sunday. I read that taking credit cards is supposed to boost your sales by at least 15%, and 30% for most people. Me? Just $6.

yes, I'm bitter. :) So much time, effort and money totally wasted. I hate shows with a passion. I never want to do a single one again. Of course, that's what I swore after every single show (a bad sign, I think) but this time, I think it's it.


Handmade jewelry, beaded beads and more available at my NEW location, bonanza.com/booths/BrightCircle

Page 3 of 4 (51 items) < Previous  1 2 3 4  Next > | RSS