I'd like to open a bead shop

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ediesbeads wrote
on Jan 21, 2011 8:09 AM

Well it finally happened.... first time in history!  I got tired of opening packs of beads! LOL!  I got two HUGE boxes from the post office this morning and started unpacking the treasures.  I had to stop half way through the second box.  LOL!  It's still a blast setting up the store!

Edie

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thebeadman7 wrote
on Jan 21, 2011 3:47 PM

Hello bright circle, I saw your post about opening a store and I share your enthusiasm. I work for a mom and pop bead supplier out of central Texas and have experienced many different things in the past years and experiences I would like to share with you for what its worth. First off if you want to sell beads for a living you can and do not let anyone tell you different. The best part about my daily routine is the interaction with people who come in our store because they want to be there, not because they have to. People come because they enjoy the experience and that makes work so enjoyable and light hearted. I have met and gotten to know personally many of my customers and to share in their success as entreprenuers. If you are serious about opening a shop then it is a good idea to consider where your going to start as far as customer base, if you have been making jewelry for a while then you have already developed a starting point for your clientel. The best way to start is to hit the circuit first, do some shows get your name out there and get a list of people you can contact everytime something new or hot comes through the door because the truth of the matter is nobody who owns a commodity business needs to do anything else until they sell something. Building a healthy customer base before you open your doors will keep you in the black during that initial push of becoming an established bead source. Most importantly you must buy right. There are too many sharks out there willing to take your money and leave you thinking you got a good deal while they sell the same thing to the next person for half of what you paid. Building your list of reliable suppliers you can build a relationship is imperative. You must sell right as well. What I mean by that is if you buy low and in turn sell low you will achieve greater success especially in todays times. For instance, if you sell a strand to someone for 3 dollars, show them how to take the first inch off and make earrings which when sold will cover the cost of the strand they purchased they will be able to sell a set for 15 dollars and their total investment in it is 3 dollars and time they will love and appreciate you. Not only will they appreciate you selling to them low, but if you can help them be successful they will in turn help you be successful by doing business with you. Do not worry about what you cannot control you must focus on what you can and don't be afraid to make some mistakes learning. I have made a good and honest living by working with bead stores across the country and have enjoyed every minute of it. Im rooting for you, its hard to beat doing what you love and making a dollar or two doing it. I know some great suppliers and some people that would be glad to help if you are interested in digging a little deeper. The biggest thing to remember about this business is you can never be everything to everyone, with stones and findings you cannot buy a wide enough inventory it will never be enough, do not get discouraged just do great with what you can get. Email me if you would like to discuss it more.

Thanks,

Jeremy

 

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DebWAZ wrote
on Jan 22, 2011 4:10 PM

ediesbeads:

Well it finally happened.... first time in history!  I got tired of opening packs of beads! LOL!  I got two HUGE boxes from the post office this morning and started unpacking the treasures.  I had to stop half way through the second box.  LOL!  It's still a blast setting up the store!

Edie

Girl, you are in TROUBLE!

We've been in the bead business for almost 7 years and I am STILL not tired of opening beads, playing with them and getting them ready to go on the walls! Maybe I'm still not jaded about opening packages of beads because, many times, I don't know what's been ordered so it's a surprise to me.

When we have a vendor visit - it's still a thrill because I get to decide which ones stay with us and which ones go away. By the time they are ready to go on the wall, they are a surprise to me because I often forget exactly what we got. My dad used to say I couldn't remember from 12 o'clock to noon!

Just wait until you have it all ready and you open the doors. I still say "good night" and "good morning" to the store every day. It's a special feeling to walk through the store and see what you've accomplished!

Deb

 

 

 

Deb

azbeaddepot.blogspot.com

 

 

 

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Posts 78
on Jan 29, 2011 8:16 PM

This has been an outstanding thread!!!

 

First of all - I have NO desire to open a bead store but I want to thank all of you that run LBS!!   I plan to make my first big online store purchase in about a month (Rio Grande start up kit) - and I use Ben Franklin on occasion but 90% of my purchases are from our LBS.  I could NOT do what I do without them.   Seeing the beads and tools in person really makes a difference for me and the staff are SO helpful with all of my newbie questions.

 

Second - I really took a lot from this thread that can be applied to the jewelry slingers of the world too.  I'm not looking for a location for a shop but I AM reviewing event listings for this year and the advice re: checking unemployment rates struck a note!  I can also see where flea markets would be a great idea now.   I also had the "yard sale" mentality but with the economy - that mind frame could work FOR us.   If people go to flea markets looking for deals they could have $ left over for a "splurge" item of jewelry! (Especially for lower priced pieces)

It also made me consider checking with realtors, car dealerships, etc... when considering a location.  If people are buying big ticket items - consider the boat shows, car shows, etc... and carry higher $ items.   If they aren't - check the smaller events and stock lower priced items.

 

I know pricing has been tricky lately b/c of the economy.  This thread has given me a lot of direction for choosing outlets for this year.   THANK YOU ALL! Smile

http://tidetogether.creatingwithcompassion.com

www.etsy.com/shop/TideTogether

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Posts 78
on Jan 29, 2011 8:18 PM

***sidenote*** Deb - just checked your link and glanced at the contest winning entries - WOW you have talent in your area!!!!!

http://tidetogether.creatingwithcompassion.com

www.etsy.com/shop/TideTogether

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Claudette48 wrote
on Jan 31, 2011 6:38 PM

What an in-depth, accurate and gracious reply.

My entire income comes from beading.  To be able to do that you have to be a great buyer, a designer, a fast  beader, a successful marketer, and a great seller.  I could absolutely do better, but I'm already doing better than the vast majority of vendors.

Besides not being wholesale, why would someone want to buy 200 + from FMG, when they could take less money and get 100 different patterns or colors without shipping costs?  If you meet the provider of the beads in person (notice I did not call him a wholesaler) than expenses are tax deductible.

Regarding terms like wholesale and retail; what about manufacturer, broker, distributor, and even wholesale can have different "layers"?  I retail and wholesale.  In my business, I utilize all five.  That means there are five different potential prices for the same item, depending at what level you are buying at, which does not count discounts or sales.  I do not haggle for my prices.

When someone comes to me and wants to buy wholesale, the first question I ask, which I say as a statement is "Retail is $$.$$, and wholesale is keystone."  If they don't know what keystone is, I know they are not a true retailer, even if they do have a resale number.  Anyone can get a resale number.  That does not make you a retailer of my product.  You could still be a hobbyist or own a furniture store.

You want to buy from a manufacturer or their distributor, so that you can wholesale, discount,  and retail at fair prices.  Many bead stores have exorbitant prices, and then can't figure out, why they can't stay in business.

Beads are not made in America.  They would be too expensive.  Beads that are made here are hand blown, one of a kind, art beads - expensive.  Therefore, if you are buying direct from the manufacturers, you probably will be talking to very nice people, but they will all have accents - some of them very difficult to understand, and be prepared to horse trade, and they can get very excited when they discuss prices.  Also, if you go to true wholesale shows, especially on a regular basis, you will get a reputation and if you are good, you will be given the lowest prices, but you still have to be prepared to haggle.

Everyone is selling beads; Michaels, Hobby Lobby, Big Lots, fabric stores, T J Max, WalMart, etc.  And they're big franchises.  Buying Power!

I have a friend who opened a bead store in Florida a year ago.  She started with 3,000.00 in beads for resale and 1,500.00 in inexpensive jewelry that she had made i.e. 10.00 price point.

She had free classes and would let anyone that wanted to teach a class so she never had to pay for her teachers.  Every time someone came into her shop, she made a friend and then sold them beads, and they kept coming back to see her and then buy beads.  Now her shop is a huge success with at least 50,000.00 retail of beads, supplies, and jewelry.  What were her secrets.

1.  Buy low, sell fair.

2. Make jewelry that can be made from beads bought right, high value, sell fair.

3.  Classes that she didn't have to do or pay for.

4. MADE FRIENDS and bought beads they would want at prices they could afford.

5.  Knowing when to stop buying something, when to buy, and buy at the lowest price she can haggle.

A year later she loves the buying, she has to spend most of her time at home making jewelry, and she hates going to her shop, except to decorate after hours, because she's tired of the gossipy women - her employees and customers.

Also, I love my business, and my pet peeve are the friends and acquaintances that tell me I am so lucky that I don't have to work for a living!  Particularly, when they work a mere 40 hours per week with weekends off and  personal days and sick days and vacation days and holidays and oh, my God, I have to scratch my butt day.  When you own your business, particularly in the beginning, you don't get days off.  You don't have perks and bonuses.  You don't have reasonable medical insurance or any.  You work 24/7 as much as 18 hours a day.  The buck stops with you and sometimes the buck isn't enough.  You don't get to be sick.  It takes persistence, perseverance, etc. and all with a smile and a great attitude, because after all, you now one of the lucky ones.  You don't have to work for a living.

So you want to own your own business?  Great, but go into it with open eyes and realistic expectations.  Put a business plan together.  That will cover everything.  Oh, you don't know how?  If you can't put a business plan together, you're not ready.  Just because you can bead or whatever it is you do, doesn't mean that you can run a business.  In fact, I would say that a successful business owner could sell anything, and not know how to bead.

What I would recommend is go to work for a bead store for 6 to 12 months.  It will save you a lot of money, grief and stress, whether you do or don't open a bead store afterwards.

By the way. there are still things I don't do well.

Good Luck.  By all means, follow your dream - with your eyes wide open . . . and I wish you the greatest success, and if I can help let me know.

amagnetaday.com

 

 

 

 

Claudette

Tip: To stop metal findings from tarnishing store in a ZIP Lock bag with a chunk of chalk.

amagnetaday

 

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DebWAZ wrote
on Feb 2, 2011 3:07 PM

Tide Together:

***sidenote*** Deb - just checked your link and glanced at the contest winning entries - WOW you have talent in your area!!!!!

Thank you for visiting the website. Yes, we have a number of talented people around here. I'd like to see them all enter BeadStar - I know they could make a good showing.

Deb

Deb

azbeaddepot.blogspot.com

 

 

 

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DebWAZ wrote
on Feb 2, 2011 6:55 PM

My comments will be bold, underlined and in itallics.

Claudette48:

What an in-depth, accurate and gracious reply.

My entire income comes from beading.  To be able to do that you have to be a great buyer, a designer, a fast  beader, a successful marketer, and a great seller.  I could absolutely do better, but I'm already doing better than the vast majority of vendors.

You have discovered that to be self-employed (no matter what business it is) you have to wear many hats. For a retail store, it also includes janitor, hostess, maintenance, supply, customer service and human relations, as well as bookkeeping and legal.

Besides not being wholesale, why would someone want to buy 200 + from FMG, when they could take less money and get 100 different patterns or colors without shipping costs?  If you meet the provider of the beads in person (notice I did not call him a wholesaler) than expenses are tax deductible.

If you make a trip to the vendor - whether at a show or at his showroom/warehouse, the expenses are tax deductible. The 200+ idea from FMG gives people the idea they are getting a better price. *I* call it "the more you spend the more you save" theory and my DH runs screaming from my "logic". Beading is like eating potato chips - you can't stop with just a few, when you have FMG dangling that 200+ price in your face. Believe it or not, I know of LBS owners who think buying at 200+ from FMG is the best thing going!

Regarding terms like wholesale and retail; what about manufacturer, broker, distributor, and even wholesale can have different "layers"?  I retail and wholesale.  In my business, I utilize all five.  That means there are five different potential prices for the same item, depending at what level you are buying at, which does not count discounts or sales.  I do not haggle for my prices.

You are exactly right about wholesale having many different layers. I think generally the public uses the term wholesale to portray a cheaper price than the average retail customer would pay. Another difference is that a qualified wholesale customer is usually exempt from sales tax when they purchase items that they would resell in their normal course of business.

When someone comes to me and wants to buy wholesale, the first question I ask, which I say as a statement is "Retail is $.$, and wholesale is keystone."  If they don't know what keystone is, I know they are not a true retailer, even if they do have a resale number.  Anyone can get a resale number.  That does not make you a retailer of my product.  You could still be a hobbyist or own a furniture store.

ROFL - very good way to sort out the true wholesale customer from the "wanna get a bargain" people. In Arizona, a person only gets the resale exemption if they buy for their business which must be related to the purchase. In other words, if you are a furniture store, your primary business is not beads or jewelry and you cannot legally buy beads or jewelry making supplies as a reseller, and you must pay sales tax on your purchase.

You want to buy from a manufacturer or their distributor, so that you can wholesale, discount,  and retail at fair prices.  Many bead stores have exorbitant prices, and then can't figure out, why they can't stay in business.

EXACTLY!!! I've been saying this all along - you don't want to buy from a retailer, you want to buy from the company who sells to them. Some vendors require a brick and mortar store to sell at the best wholesale prices, others have a certain dollar figure per year that will get you the best prices.

The stereotype (which is all to often true) of "LBS are TOO expensive" is why I have said from the start that I won't have anything in my store priced higher than I would be willing to pay for it - knowing what quality it is. Whether you are selling beads or beaded jewelry, you want to get the best price possible and pass the savings to your customer.

Beads are not made in America.  They would be too expensive.  Beads that are made here are hand blown, one of a kind, art beads - expensive.  Therefore, if you are buying direct from the manufacturers, you probably will be talking to very nice people, but they will all have accents - some of them very difficult to understand, and be prepared to horse trade, and they can get very excited when they discuss prices.  Also, if you go to true wholesale shows, especially on a regular basis, you will get a reputation and if you are good, you will be given the lowest prices, but you still have to be prepared to haggle.

My husband laughed at me as I was learning to haggle with vendors. One of the key phrases I learned was "what's your best price?". Another was "How much if I take them all?" - THAT ONE makes you really popular with vendors at the end of shows!

As an additional note: some people are worried about beads labeled "made in China" or "made in India". Regardless of where the stone is quarried, the processing is usually done in China or India (often in poor conditions, unfortunately). It's possible to find Sleeping Beauty Turquoise that is labeled "made in China" because it was shipped there for processing and therefore is "made in China".

Everyone is selling beads; Michaels, Hobby Lobby, Big Lots, fabric stores, T J Max, WalMart, etc.  And they're big franchises.  Buying Power!

Yes, buying power is the key, but buying from vendors who will give you a good price AND buying the stuff that the "big boxes" don't carry is another good way to compete with them. I have customers who come in every day with a bag from any one of the above stores, trying to match something they bought there because, "(name of store) doesn't carry ANYTHING I need to finish this" as my customers tell me.

I have a friend who opened a bead store in Florida a year ago.  She started with 3,000.00 in beads for resale and 1,500.00 in inexpensive jewelry that she had made i.e. 10.00 price point.

She had free classes and would let anyone that wanted to teach a class so she never had to pay for her teachers.  Every time someone came into her shop, she made a friend and then sold them beads, and they kept coming back to see her and then buy beads.  Now her shop is a huge success with at least 50,000.00 retail of beads, supplies, and jewelry.  What were her secrets.

1.  Buy low, sell fair.

2. Make jewelry that can be made from beads bought right, high value, sell fair.

3.  Classes that she didn't have to do or pay for.

4. MADE FRIENDS and bought beads they would want at prices they could afford.

5.  Knowing when to stop buying something, when to buy, and buy at the lowest price she can haggle.

A year later she loves the buying, she has to spend most of her time at home making jewelry, and she hates going to her shop, except to decorate after hours, because she's tired of the gossipy women - her employees and customers.

Sounds like your friend and I had different mothers together, for the most part. <LOL> I LOVE my store! I only have one employee - for packaging and inventory control - and like your friend, I don't have to pay anyone to teach my classes. I don't mind the gossip too much. Most of the time, it gives me a little news and sometimes I can get an edge on my competition.

Also, I love my business, and my pet peeve are the friends and acquaintances that tell me I am so lucky that I don't have to work for a living!  Particularly, when they work a mere 40 hours per week with weekends off and  personal days and sick days and vacation days and holidays and oh, my God, I have to scratch my butt day.  When you own your business, particularly in the beginning, you don't get days off.  You don't have perks and bonuses.  You don't have reasonable medical insurance or any.  You work 24/7 as much as 18 hours a day.  The buck stops with you and sometimes the buck isn't enough.  You don't get to be sick.  It takes persistence, perseverance, etc. and all with a smile and a great attitude, because after all, you now one of the lucky ones.  You don't have to work for a living.

You hit that one out of the ballpark! Even after 7 years in business, we can't close just because we want a day off. I get grief from my customers if we open late or close early once in a month or two. I had to deal with that "you don't have a real job" with one of my mother's caregivers. She actually had the nerve to demand that I close the store - literally throw out any customers and go running because "your mother's not right".

So you want to own your own business?  Great, but go into it with open eyes and realistic expectations.  Put a business plan together.  That will cover everything.  Oh, you don't know how?  If you can't put a business plan together, you're not ready.  Just because you can bead or whatever it is you do, doesn't mean that you can run a business.  In fact, I would say that a successful business owner could sell anything, and not know how to bead.

I laugh a little about this one. We don't have a written business plan, but my DH and I work our business plan every day, because we literally live our business. We know where we stand compared to previous years. We know what promotions work and which ones won't ever see the light of day again. We talk business constantly - inventory issues, which supplier has gotten too high priced for the quality, what new items we should carry, whether an old reliable item ought to fade away, etc. But it's not our only conversation - thank goodness! We have an accountant to advise us on tax related items and we have 2 attorneys in the family for the legal stuff. Otherwise, we scour business and marketing newsletters and keep up with business news.

We also stay active on a city/local level, as advocates for our business and other "mom & pop" businesses in our town because we all have to help promote each other.It's not enough to know what vendors to use or what your competition is doing. You also have to know what is going on in the "real" world - the world's politics as well as the price of commodities/oil and changes in the stock market or the spot price of precious metals all can have an effect on your business. [For example, the head of Exxon was on a program today and said he expects oil to hit $200/barrel. That means gas will be $5-6/gallon. People paying that much more for gas means that there will be far less money available for beads. It also means that the cost of our beads will increase as well as the cost of shipping them to us!]

What I would recommend is go to work for a bead store for 6 to 12 months.  It will save you a lot of money, grief and stress, whether you do or don't open a bead store afterwards.

Very good advice. Working in a bead store first would give you a good idea of whether you really do want to open a bead store, though there is still a lot of stuff that goes on in a store that the average employee doesn't have a clue about. We played hooky on Friday - our first day off in almost 2 years. I had one of our instructors fill in for us. She spent a couple of days beforehand learning the computer and shadowing me for general operations. When we got back on Saturday morning, she said she decided that she's not even remotely interested in owning a bead store. I still say that when it stops being fun, I'll put up a "For Sale" sign. 

By the way. there are still things I don't do well.

Good Luck.  By all means, follow your dream - with your eyes wide open . . . and I wish you the greatest success, and if I can help let me know.

amagnetaday.com

Thanks, Claudette, for your insight and comments. If you ever get out to Arizona, please stop by and say "Hi". The coffee pot's always on. DH has become the "bead store barista" - blending, roasting and grinding his own coffee beans - YUMMY!

 

Deb

azbeaddepot.blogspot.com

 

 

 

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Claudette48 wrote
on Feb 2, 2011 11:09 PM

You are 110 percent correct.  Thank you for every bit of it.

You never can tell when we'll meet.  I travel all over the US doing shows and travel through Arizona a couple of times a year.

Truth be known, I've never done a business plan for my business, BUT I know how to do one, if I had to.  You don't have to have the business plan, but you do need to know what's in it.

You are absolutely right.  When you are a small business owner, you need to wear EVERY hat, including toilet cleaner and everything in between and like it.

Again,you are absolutely correct.  The natural resources come from all over the world into the countries in Asia, ie China, India, Pakistan, Taiwan, Japan  They have the technology, the fine artisans, and the inexpensive labor to design, shape, grind, drill, polish, exporting fees, and still bring a product to the table that is affordable.  Regarding the inexpensive labor; no they do not get paid like we do or have benefits as we know them, but for their economy they are employed and able to take care of their families.  Ask them.  Much better than being unemployed.  I do resent when American companies, pay them pennies, and then pay a spokesperson tens of thousands of dollars and charge an enormous price for their product. Shame on them. At least the bead brokers sell the beads at prices where they could be sold at a reasonable price so that beading can be affordable.

By the way, in every barrel there is the proverbial apple, so beware of the Swarovski that isn't real, reconstituted or invented stones, dyed stones that will bleed on clothing or fade, or sterling on gold that is not real.  Yes, maybe THE link that is marked is real, but the rest may not be.

TIP:  Always carry a magnet with you.  Real silver or gold will not "stick" to a magnet.

Nice web site.  I like the things you said.  You are very honest and honorable.

Thank you again and I am looking forward to meeting you some day.

Blessings,

Claudette

amagnetaday.com

 

Claudette

Tip: To stop metal findings from tarnishing store in a ZIP Lock bag with a chunk of chalk.

amagnetaday

 

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Claudette48 wrote
on Feb 2, 2011 11:36 PM

You're brilliant.  You have already figured something out that most jewelry exhibitors never do.  Sell where no one else sells!  Most beader's want to sell at craft or art shows.  So do all of the other beader's, until the Promoter won't take anymore jewelry, then what do you do? If you stay home, you make no money.

Pick ANY show; garden, boat, beauty, home, tool, show or seafood, shark, rattlesnake festival, chili cook off, etc. Call the Promoter and tell them you make jewelry with whatever charm is appropriate. You may not get into all of the ones you call and some may be too expensive, but you'll clean up at the ones you do get into.  Why - women come to those types of shows and they come with money - AND you have no competition.  You can afford to pay more for rent, because you make so much more money.  Today more and more Promoters and taking in different types of exhibitors, because so many are no longer showing because of the economy. Also, if it is a show with big ticket items, point out that your price point is only for example, 20.00 and that it takes a lot of 20.00 sales to pay the rent, so would he consider a lower rent?  Many will.  A full booth is better than  an empty booth.  Some money is better than no money.

Interestingly enough and this may surprise, you would think that those buyers would really buy the charmed jewelry, but they usually buy the other items, because they really are just women shopping for what they like.  So don't make too much or make it so you can remove the charm if they don't sell.

Blessings

Claudette

amagnetaday.com

 

Claudette

Tip: To stop metal findings from tarnishing store in a ZIP Lock bag with a chunk of chalk.

amagnetaday

 

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DebWAZ wrote
on Feb 3, 2011 6:49 PM

Claudette48:

Interestingly enough and this may surprise, you would think that those buyers would really buy the charmed jewelry, but they usually buy the other items, because they really are just women shopping for what they like.  So don't make too much or make it so you can remove the charm if they don't sell.

Blessings

Claudette

amagnetaday.com

 

Besides the women who attend those events, you also have to think about the guys who buy out of guilt!

Deb

 

 

Deb

azbeaddepot.blogspot.com

 

 

 

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Claudette48 wrote
on Feb 4, 2011 10:21 AM

Not only do not forget the men, but don't forget the children.  They have more spendable income than one would think.  Especially at a festival they'll get extra spending money.  Also, the older I get the younger they look, so don't under estimate your audience.  ALLOW everyone to buy your product.  You will be surprised more than once.

At one fair I went to, I was watching a dirty, homeless person wandering by the booths.  People were not ignoring her, but were obvious in their dislike.  Her clothes were nasty, her hair was filthy, looked like a wild woman with straw like, dirty blond, bleached tips, old, and in general her appearance was just awful.  Finally she came to a booth where there was a 35 year old helping her Mother sell jewelry she had made - this whole area of the fair was jewelry - she smiled brightly at the lady and asked her if she could help her in any way.  Then helped her try on different pieces.  The sale came to $400.00.  Need I say more?  Except, that the next year, the same thing happened, and she bought $280.00.

Blessings

Claudette

amagnetaday.com

 

Claudette

Tip: To stop metal findings from tarnishing store in a ZIP Lock bag with a chunk of chalk.

amagnetaday

 

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ediesbeads wrote
on Feb 28, 2011 11:18 AM

Just an update!  We open WEDNESDAY!  Yikes!  I am on pins and needles!  The store is 99% ready to open.  I have a little more organizing to do, I want to mop the floors, and my sign is ready to pick up... just need DH to help me hang it.  There are of course a million additional things I COULD do to make it better, but I have to start somewhere and get the doors open.  I will just keep puttering away and pricing and putting out more things every day!  Wish me luck!

Edie :) :) :)

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Ruth. wrote
on Feb 28, 2011 12:24 PM

Lots of luck coming your way. Congrats on the new store!

Shippensburg Pennsylvania - about 30 minutes from Gettysburg

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Claudette48 wrote
on Feb 28, 2011 2:45 PM

Congratulations!

Tell us where you are?  You might have a visit or two.  I even went on your profile to see what town you live in, but not one little tiny clue.  With as many people that come "here" you might be surprised that one of us might come and visit  you in a physical form!  I travel all over the USA so you never can tell what city I might be traveling through.  Let us know where you are and you might not only get a visit, but maybe a card, a open house gift, who knows?

Claudette

amagnetaday

Claudette

Tip: To stop metal findings from tarnishing store in a ZIP Lock bag with a chunk of chalk.

amagnetaday

 

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