Is this how a flush cutter should be?

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Zoë So wrote
on Jan 30, 2009 6:35 AM

Today I received a flush cutter, Xuron tapered head micro shear (15 Pounds/ 20 USD)

http://www.xuron.com/industrial/shears.htm

It is really sharp but it doesn't cut as "flush" as I had expected. Now I noticed something, and I wonder if this is normal. So let's compare your flush cutter with mine!

It's a bit hard to explain it in English, but okay, there we go:

When the blades are together, and I am facing the flat side of the cutter, the blades don't flow smoothly from one and other. Going from one blade to the other with my fingernail, there is difference of, let's say, 0.5 mm.

I am about to re-ship it, but if this is normal, then I have to think about it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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SCB1 wrote
on Jan 30, 2009 10:52 AM

I have  never used that brand, so I don't know how they should be. The brand we all fight over to use at work are Swanstrom tapered flush cutter. They have a little lnger handle and that makes cutting very easy. I am a retired tailor but I work "on call"  at my favorite bead store.

Happy Beading!!

Sue,

Small-town USA. 

Michigan.

 

 

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Billy Z wrote
on Jan 30, 2009 1:45 PM

 On the flat side of the cutter head, both halves should meet up perfectly flush. If not, definitely send them back. Any difference between the two will cause a burr and the more that they are off, the worse the burr will be. If you have to majorly file and deburr the ends anyway, then there isn't much point to even having the flush cutters, ya know.

 Billy ;o)

 I yam wut I yam and dats all wut I yam. ~Popeye~

Dragonfly Jewelry Designs - ArtFire Artisan Studio

 

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Zoë So wrote
on Jan 30, 2009 3:28 PM

Thank you both very much.

Billy, I am glad you confirmed my feeling. I am really not happy with the result of the cutter. I am going to reship to the UK from Europe mainland. 

And right now I am thinking about buying a (double) flush cutter of "out of my league" brand. I am starting to believe more and more that a good cutter is worth gold.

Thank you again, and goodnight.

 

 

 

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Sherri S. wrote
on Jan 30, 2009 6:52 PM

I agree with Billy that both sides of the cutter head should meet up perfectly.  If I were you, I would send them back.  The best beading tools are made in Europe (Swanstrom and Lindstrom are the best).  The tools made in Pakistan are a little better than what you purchased, but they say that you should buy the best tools that you can afford.  The Swanstrom and Lindstrom brands cost around $45-$50 USD each tool.  I have a complete set, and can tell you that you would not be sorry with this purchase and they are most definitely worth the extra money.

 Sherri S.

Check out my Etsy Store......

http://www.etsy.com/shop.php?user_id=6321824

Check out my Etsy Beads Store.......

http://www.etsy.com/shop.php?user_id=7141344

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Zoë So wrote
on Jan 31, 2009 1:18 AM

Sherri, now I am even more determined to buy a -strom tool. Or an other $45 + tool. I am getting tired of buying tools that just aren't 'it'.To be continued!

 

 

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SCB1 wrote
on Jan 31, 2009 1:43 AM

Sherri S.:
The best beading tools are made in Europe (Swanstrom and Lindstrom are the best). 

Actualy Swanstroms are made in the USA. I only know that because I was looking at them yesterday. Superior WI. is what their web site says. So If you want quality and want to buy American made Swanstrom is the brand for you. I have used them and they are really great. I don't own a pair yet but I want to, they are on my wish list.

Happy Beading!!

Sue,

Small-town USA. 

Michigan.

 

 

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Xurontools wrote
on Aug 10, 2010 12:38 PM

Hello --

I am new to this forum.. my name is Abby and I work for Xuron Corp - the company that  makes the tool the OP mentions.  I am not here to "sell" anything but simply to learn what I can about beading/jewelry making and hopefully clear up any confusion about how our tools function. 

That said, Xuron® brand cutters are desinged to by-pass (they do not meet perfectly edge-to-edge). Most other brands -- including the really good ones like Swanstrom and Lindstrom, cut by compression.  The sharp blades of a Xuron ® cutter will not do this -- instead, one blade by passes the other for a shearing type of cut.  The result, we hope, is a flat end on wire with no spike in the middle. 

There are many great brands on the market and we appreciate that everyone has her (or his) own preferences.  Please feel free to come to me anytime if there are questions/concerns about any Xuron tool you purchase.  If something is not to your satisfaction, we will be glad to correct it.

Smile

 

 

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Cat_P wrote
on Aug 10, 2010 12:44 PM

I have the  Xurons and Lindstroms.  For cutting wire, I prefer my Xurons and for beading wire, my lindstroms.

No cutters EVER made will make a perfectly flush cut. Yes my lindstroms cut pretty flush and so do my Xurons but with BOTH there will always be a burr, no matter what. Unless you use a jewelers saw, you'll still need to file if it's for ear wires or something. Otherwise I think both cutters work fine for regular work.

Cat     Blog  Artfire  Etsy

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leny21 wrote
on Nov 11, 2012 11:18 AM

What about cutting a jump ring .What kind of cutter u need to buy ? I'm trying to make my own jump rings but I don't know what cutter to buy the best for it.

Please advice. thanks

 

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shanks wrote
on Nov 12, 2012 10:04 AM

You need a jewelers saw to do it right.  Without buying a special tool for making jump rings, try cutting a small "V" in a small block of wood so as to hold the coiled wire.  Get a cheap drill bit set to use for the mandrels, a pair of small ViceGrip's to clamp onto a drill bit and winde the wire down the smooth part of the bit. Using the jewelers saw, undo the blade, run the blade inside the the rolled wire, reattach to the saw frame, place the rolled wire into the "V" in the wood, and saw the wire. Use as thin of blade they make.  The drill bits allow you to make what ever size ring you want. I got the bits at my local $$$Store.

Shanks

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