Fireline for beading on a loom

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Sb2boys wrote
on Nov 17, 2008 1:23 PM

Can you use Fireline or something similar when beading on a loom, instead of Nymo?  What are the pros and cons of Fireline and Nymo?

Thank you for your help!

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Posts 367
on Nov 17, 2008 2:12 PM

My experience is an absolute YES. FireLine or better still, Beadalon's WildFire are totally suitable for loom work. The biggest differences I find are:

Pro Nymo: comes in many colors, so can be easily matched to blend in with bead work; loomed pieces show more thread especially along the edges. Very supple if fluidity is what you want.

Pro WildFire: much stronger than other beading threads, harder to accidentally pierce with needle, knots well and easily. The black or neutral green work well with most bead colors. Stiffer than other threads, can add a nice body to your bead work.

 

sleeplessbeader.blogspot.com

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Sb2boys wrote
on Nov 17, 2008 2:47 PM

If I did a bracelet, do you think Fireline would be too stiff?

Thanks again!  :)

 

 

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Posts 367
on Nov 18, 2008 6:59 AM

No probelm, none, FireLine is great--not too stiff, just stiffer than Nymo, generally. I use it all the time (WildFire, actually) and it drapes and folds beautifully.

 

sleeplessbeader.blogspot.com

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Posts 927
on Nov 18, 2008 12:21 PM

 Fireline is also perfect if you are looming in the 'no warp' method. Then, running your needle through the rows will insure 'not' picking up a sliver of Nymo. Then, pulling the thread to eliminate the warps become effortless.

I also use Nymo for my looming. I like the 'slinky' feel of the beading, with Nymo. I may make the outside two warps 'Fireline' to help secure any fringing and to offer a white line edging with a dark pattern. I also do this method because I have found a flawless way to 'end' or 'tie off' my looming. The Fireline works great, being that stiff!

One thing for sure, though, I ALWAYS use more then one color for my looming! For example, if the pattern is dark, with some clear white sprinkled in, then I warp my loom with black and use white Nymo for wefting. This white does not show through the looming, only the black, but ALL of the beads shine through wonderfully with the white thread!

I may have answered more then needed, but I get so excited about my looming that I look foward to talking about it!!!

Erin

wrote
on Nov 19, 2008 7:23 AM

Care to share your ending technique?  I'm always looking for a good way not to tuck in all the threads at the end, and I don't always want to use my Mirrix loom.  Never hurts to ask, right?

 

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Posts 367
on Nov 19, 2008 7:31 AM

 

Some alternative endings I've used for loomed work:

 

Easiest--leave thread fringes and knot them close to the loomwork in evenly spaced clusters.

Stitching a backing on my cuff using an overcast stitch and a finished edge ribbon or fabric, I simply tuck in the end threads before sewing the final side. (I tie the ends in a loose knot first for convenience.) The ribbon also gives me a fabric for attachment of a hook and eye or other clasp.

I've also used the basketweave crimp ends, but: be careful not to break the end beads or threads, and your work needs to be the width of the crimps.

 

 

 

sleeplessbeader.blogspot.com

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Posts 927
on Nov 19, 2008 1:01 PM

 Leslie, those are some of the ways I have ended, too!

Have you ever tried 'Fireline' with the crimps? They don't seem to be as sensitive to cut/break the ends.

I use a 'stitch method', which I haven't written down yet. I prefer to bead then write!!! lol

Erin

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anne@786 wrote
on Nov 19, 2008 10:41 PM

Hi, I'm Anne & have just joined as I was desperate to find out more about loomwork.

Having recently finished some loomwork which had about 150 or so tie-offs, what is this "no-warp" loomwork which has been mentioned in the reponses to this question?

Is it just referring to the native american method of using the loom, or can this mean that I don't have to tie off most of those warp rows, & does not refer to pulling up the warp thread - at which I am pretty hopeless.

Would appreciate any thoughts on this, or any reference material if you know of some.

Regards, Anne

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Posts 927
on Nov 20, 2008 6:22 AM

 This thread title is 'perfect' for this question! I can share my way of completing this type of looming, but I hope others can share theirs, too!

You have to consider the type loom used. It will need to allow the warp ends to be 'lifted' or the loom 'collaspable' to remove the warps, in one piece, loops and all. (loops meaning the ends created when warping with 'one' thread.)

I use Fireline to warp my loom. I use any thread I prefer, as the weft. It can be more 'Fireline', which will make a stiffer looming, or you can use a Nymo, any color, size D for more body or size B for a slinkier feel. Then loom as usual.

When your looming is completed, lift or collasp the loom to remove the 'entire' loomed piece, as one section. You will have all the warps as loops on the ends, except for one, which is where the Fireline started. Start with the 'farthest' loop and gently 'pull' or 'slip' it through the beading till the loop on the other end is smaller. Swith sides, and do the same with the next loop in line. You should be finishing with one 'extremely' long thread of 'Fireline'.

This method can be accomplished using Nymo or any other thread as the warps. However, be very careful not to allow your needle to 'pick up' or 'split' ANY of the warp threads. This will not allow the warps to be 'pulled' through the beading. Fireline is very difficult to 'knick' with your needle and thread, while wefting. There maybe other similar threads that can be used, but be sure they are 'solid' like Fireline.

Erin

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anne@786 wrote
on Nov 26, 2008 11:19 PM

Oooh, thank you Erin! This is a very clear explanation of this technique. I I did not know that this technique was known as the 'no warp method'.

I have tried it with limited success with nymo, but I work with fireline a lot & feel sure that it would probably work better than the Nymo or other thread. I recently made a large bag tag for my daughter in loomwork, & had the problem of finding a suitable backing. In the end I had to go for a material which may be too firm & perhaps it could start to unglue. If I had used fireline I would have been able to choose a lighter weight backing material.

Regards, Anne

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RedCreations wrote
on Dec 2, 2008 8:12 PM

Hey there :-)

Speaking of FireLine - my beadweaving/looming medium of choice...helpful tip...

FireLine comes in "Crystal" which is kind of a non-harsh white color...And the advantage to taking up stock in the white is that SHARPIE MARKERS (permenant ink) come in every color of the rainbow now-a-days. :-) So you can take the Crsytal FireLine and color it to match your beading project better. The color is nice and permenant.

Another thing you can do for a quick fix to lighten up darker FireLine is to run it between a papertowel that's been moistened with Windex. It takes some of the darkness off and helps it to be become more of a neautral grey color that will blend in easier with many (tho not ALL!) colors... Especially with Loomwork where thread does show up along the sides... <--- Though there's nothing wrong with a little side bead embellishment to cover all that. :-)

Hope this was helpful, ~Leah

wrote
on Dec 8, 2008 1:35 PM

That's the finishing technique I was thinking of.  That's the recommended technique for the Mirrix Loom.  I tried it once (having used Nymo), and it didn't work for beans.  I'll have to give it another try using my fishing line of choice.  Sounds like it will be much more successful.  Thanks for sharing!

 

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PattiC@14 wrote
on Dec 17, 2008 3:02 PM

Erin, can you explain the "no warp" method?  Is this what you refer to when  you say you found a flawless way to end or tie off your looming?  I love loomwork but stopped doing it because of the warp ends.

Thanks! PeP

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Posts 927
on Dec 18, 2008 5:57 PM

PattiC:

Erin, can you explain the "no warp" method?  Is this what you refer to when  you say you found a flawless way to end or tie off your looming?  I love loomwork but stopped doing it because of the warp ends.

Thanks! PeP

 

 Sure! I wrote about it in some detail above, a few replies above this one. The basic idea is that you will end up with only one thread to weave back into your work. Read it again and see if it makes sense, or I can try to explain it another way if you'd like.

To share other techniques, that I have created over the years of looming, would be way to hard to explain without showing some pictures. I'll have to work on something and take pictures as I go. Each shape deams a different manner if finishing the warps, I found through trial and error, lol! Presently I am working on cuffs, called "Picture This Cuffs", like these,

As you can see, these are not that difficult to end, or remove the warps. I use a square stitch method I tried to perfect, which secures the edges quite well. These pop off the loom, attach a clasp and they're done. I think that is why I am making so many of them...not only that, the ideas are endless!! lol Let me finish my 'run' with these and I will start some other ideas to share. I have some commissions to complete, too!

Erin

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