How do I finish a loomwork bracelet ends so I may add a clasp.

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Jim Moore wrote
on Dec 19, 2011 5:50 AM

Greeting all...

 

I am a retired Jeweler (an 80 year old hippie)

I have searched for a week to find an answer to this question and as of this writing I have not found one.

The answers I have found end with "then add an appropriate clasp" ???

The bracelets I make now are only 8 warp threads deep (wide). I have a pretty good end for that size.

I would like to make a deeper bracelet to make a larger design. Any thing deeper  than 8 warps threads just doesn't cut it.

Anybody out there have a simple answer?

 

Hugs and Happiness to all suffering beings..

 

Jim Moore

silverknots.etsy.com

 

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Posts 39
on Dec 20, 2011 3:23 PM

They make a finding called a ribbon crimp, they come in all sorts of sizes and simply crimp over the end of your work ( think like a binder clip, only much, much prettier and without the little arms). 

Another way you could go would be to mount your loomwork piece on a piece of beading foundation, and then mount the bead foundation to a metal cuff form. All you would have to do then is finish the back with ultrasuede or some other material, and you don't have to worry about a clasp at all!

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Jim Moore wrote
on Dec 21, 2011 3:02 AM

Many Thanks!

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Beadicted wrote
on Apr 14, 2013 12:55 PM

I did that several times, and it shattered the beads and dangled on a thread and then became removable easily even when cramped. I wouldn't recommend that information if you're looking to make a necklace piece. As far as the suggestion to put it on a backing, maybe that would work but it's not the look I'm going for on my current piece of loomwork (a translucent, frosted necklace).

 

Are there any other clasp end possibilities for loom pieces?

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D.M.Z wrote
on Apr 14, 2013 2:26 PM

Beadicted, there is a specific safe way to mount your beaded bracelet (or necklace) into a ribbon crimp (RC). When you have the piece done you take the RC and slide it from the side onto the piece, note how much space shows on top and bottom. Take the RC off and gently start closing the gap with flat pliers, try it on the piece again and again until you have it to where the piece of beadwork goes into the crimp with the teeth of the RC between a row of beads. It won't be real snug, but nicely fitted. Now slide the RC off one more time and apply E6000 to the end of the beadwork (just the end and if like two rows are totally under the RC, you can get the E6000 down like one row and leave the last row without) and slide the RC on for the last time with the teeth side underneath, give it just a tiny squeeze and work the other side. Let the bracelet or necklace dry for a good 24 hours. This is not the easiest thing to do, since these were not originally made for beads, but for ribbons and fabric. It does look great though. The directions sound tedious, but it is not really. Otherwise, you can put any end on a loomed piece that you can on most any beadwork item. There are some really nice stone and glass toggles I've seen.......like Fire Mtn that I'd look seriously at for a translucent and frosted necklace. Donna

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Beadicted wrote
on Apr 15, 2013 1:27 PM

Hi :)

That's exactly what I had done- several different times- and it shattered every last bead I tried, even a row of 15's. It wound up being just a thread inside. I thought of injecting E-6000, but then it would simply be glue with a line of thread inside and would probably fall apart at some point, which is something I'm not comfortable with since it will be holding up about 8 ounces worth of beads in weight or heavier. That's why I'd posted my OP in this thread; I'm trying to figure out what else will work. The only thing I can think of now would be to use epoxy clay and sculpt my own clasp and sink the beads into it.

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SCB1 wrote
on Apr 15, 2013 1:34 PM

Instead of using a ribbon clamp for the end, have you tired using a slide clasp? They have them with sever holes in them, where you can tie your thread ends to it. No glue, no taking the chance of breaking your bead work, it might just be your answer.

Happy Beading!!

Sue,

Temperance,Michigan

 

 

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Beadicted wrote
on Apr 15, 2013 1:37 PM

I have several sizes of slide-lock clasps, but the holes don't line up, unfortunately..

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Beadicted wrote
on Apr 15, 2013 1:37 PM

I have several sizes of slide-lock clasps, but the holes don't line up, unfortunately.. it would have been wonderful if they did, though.

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SCB1 wrote
on Apr 15, 2013 2:26 PM

I found some at Hobby Lobby that don't have the little holes, but has a bar that runs the length of the clasp. Maybe if you can find them, they were in the clearance section at Hobby Lobby.

Happy Beading!!

Sue,

Temperance,Michigan

 

 

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Posts 192
on Apr 15, 2013 5:47 PM

I (Allie) saw this question this morning and did a video for it using a bar clasp.  It will probably take most of the night to upload to our YouTube channel, but should be there by morning.  Was the bracelet you were making made with a standard loom, meaning that there are a number of warp threads?  The piece I used in the video used the Ricks Beading Loom, but I did mention how you can take the individual warp threads that are left over and using square stitch to add a row of seed beads.  After that you can circle back through the last row made on the loom , then back through the seed beads again, and always circling your thread.  That would allow you to attach the bar clasp then the way we did with the Ricks Loom to that last row of seed beads, without having too much thread showing.  If we get time, we can try to make another video with a more traditional loom if the explanation in the video doesn't make sense.

- Allie & Nathan
Potomac Bead Company

www.potomacbeads.com
Buy Online: www.thebeadco.com 

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Posts 158
on Apr 15, 2013 6:26 PM

You could weave in all your ends nicely and then crochet 2 squares to glue onto the ends, with a row or two of the crochet square sticking out. Then when you add the crimps, glue/squash it onto the bits of crochet that are sticking out.

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Posts 908
on Apr 30, 2013 1:55 PM

OH, my. I read through this post and cringe. I just finished teaching a class at Bead Soup, in Savage Mills Maryland. It is a two part class. The first is how to warp, what thread, etc. The second is attaching a clasp. This past class was using a Ribbon Clasp, but I call it a 'crunchie clasp'! lol Here is a picture of the class cuff I shared with the students.

I offered two different patterns, so students could decide if they had enough time to complete the extension, of the butterfly, during the week days between class. Funny, but everyone picked the butterfly, then purchased the flower pattern.

The May class will offer another cuff using a box clasp with multiple rings. This is the cuff we will be sharing.

Please so not slide the Ribbon Clasp, 'crunchie clasp' across the line of beading. It may cut a thread. It is best to just clamp it down, using a pair of pliers with a plastic liner.

Also, try not to use the warp thread for attaching any clasp. They won't be stable enough. Maybe my pictures will offer some inspiration.

 One more note. You can't get this creative using a Rick's Loom or any other loom, offering a 'minimal warp finish'. They aren't needed either. I have a means that makes it perfect, no matter what loom. I do own a Rick's and the others, but only using them to create accent pieces for my cuffs woven on a standard loom. My classes sell the looms we use, but not anything I sell myself. I just have them created for the class, with specific design. So may of the students are now hooked on weaving on a loom. Their loom has not been naked since they took a class...or take every class. They sell out too quick! It truly is time for weaving on a loom to have it's day in the sun! Cool

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D.M.Z wrote
on Apr 30, 2013 3:07 PM

Erin, If the ribbon clasp is not crimped down all the way, it cannot cut a thread when sliding it onto the woven piece because it will not touch a thread. I use either nylon jaw pliers or even just flat nose pliers and just take care when I am doing it so that I don't mar the finish. 

Your ribbon clasps look more like a "V" shape, where the ones I use are a bit boxier, but I have never had a problem sliding that ribbon clasp onto a bracelet. My first "test" bracelet was worn daily for over a year, the jump rings gave first, replaced them with split rings, then the ball and socket clasp that I used at the ends of the ribbon clasp actually started to wear out from being opened and closed, so I replaced that, but the ribbon clasp, glued with E6000 continues to hold perfectly.

Wish I was on your side of the country, I'd be in one or more of your classes for sure. I love my looms, all of them, well, one of them is not a special fave of mine now. What is the date for the book? Donna

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Posts 158
on Apr 30, 2013 7:50 PM

I knew Erin would set us all on the straight path eventually! I love your clasps, pity we don't have such fancy ones over here in Australia. Still waiting for your book!

I think you can do any pattern with any loom, well except those plastic ones like I used to use... Come to think of it, why did I defend it so?? Haha!

And don't forget too, that not everyone has good access to classes and looms. So we don't always have to have the same stuff as somebody else, just because it is recommended. Some of us rely on the internet for our classes, a lot of reading about our looms and tools, and have to make do with what we have available to us.

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