The Secret of the Beadable Bugles

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Radiance@3 wrote
on Jun 5, 2008 9:55 AM
Bugles can be so beautiful -- especially the twisted ones, with the way they bounce light around! But every bugle bead I've ever used has sliced right through my thread, so I just don't even try to use them anymore. But last night, giddy with my recent discovery of Fireline, I dug out some old bugles and tried again. Sure enough, even Fireline couldn't stand up to those sharp edges. I do know about placing seedbeads at each end of the bugle, but that doesn't work consistently... So what's the secret? I see other beaders using bugles with no apparent trouble. Is there some particular brand that ISN'T razor-sharp? Or... (oh please don't tell me this) ...are these other beaders actually sitting down and carefully filing off all the sharp edges of every blasted bead before they begin? Is that really the only way? Please, somebody, let me in on The Secret of the Beadable Bugles!
Carol
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Nemeton wrote
on Jun 5, 2008 12:18 PM

 I know what you mean, I would use bugles a lot more too if it weren't for the risk factor! Some are sharper than others - but it varies from batch to batch so I can't really generalize. I've never resorted to filing the ends (life's too short) and I really hate Fireline (I like my beadweaving slinky) but I have had some success with putting seed beads at either end, and I'm just very careful about where and how I use bugle beads. I try not to put them anywhere 'structural' (such as the intersections of netting), but always try to engineer the piece so that the thread is passing straight through them and not coming out of the ends at an angle. Fringing is ideal (a lush fringe with those twisted ones is fabulous) and they are good for embellishments where the thread isn't taking the strain (such as diagonally across a big right angle weave trellis). I tie lots of 'just in case' knots when I'm using bugles, so if they do slice the thread I only lose a little bit of the work.

PowerPro is a bit more resistant than Fireline, but it's quite thick, so you wouldn't want to use it for everything... might be worth a try though.

Having said all that, I have a random peyote collar with all sorts of bugles, stone chips, diagonal cut beads, sweepings, you name it... I've worn it lots, had it several years now, it's on ordinary polyester sewing thread and still going strong, so maybe I'm unnecessarily paranoid!

Lynn

 

My website: http://lynndavybeadwork.co.uk/

 

 

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Radiance@3 wrote
on Jun 5, 2008 1:59 PM
~~~ Good ideas, thank you! I haven't been much of a fringer in the past, but if it would allow me to use my bugles, I'll by golly FRINGE something! =D ~~~ The piece I tried last night was the Bargello bracelet in the current issue of Beadwork -- such a brilliant design! I really want to make it, but the bugles in it are very much structural, and they definitely turn corners. ~~~ Maybe the Beadwork people can ask the designer for us -- how on earth did she get those bracelets to hold together?
Carol
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Posts 251
Nemeton wrote
on Jun 5, 2008 2:24 PM

 I wondered that when I saw that bracelet too... but it must be a good technique as there are several versions illustrated! I would never have dared to make a piece like that. Yes, please tell us what the secret is!

Lynn

 

My website: http://lynndavybeadwork.co.uk/

 

 

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on Jun 5, 2008 2:40 PM

 I use bugles with Nymo D all the time, for fringe and in free-form peyote bracelets, and netted pieces.  I always use seed beads on each side of the bugles, and I've never had a problem with the bugles cutting my thread.  Maybe the secret is the brand I use - if so, you're welcome to it.  I use only Miyuki bugles, and I pick out any of the broken ones before I begin the project.  Miyuki bugles are a little pricier than your average bugles, but I think they're worth it, considering that I've never had a problem with my work falling apart due to cut thread.  Good luck - I'd be interested to know if you ever get bugles to work for you.

Karo

 

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Posts 113
Radiance@3 wrote
on Jun 6, 2008 3:25 PM
I'm not sure whether I have any Miyukis or not -- I've always bought them from two local stores who assure me that all their seeds and bugles are Japanese, but not necessarily any single brand. I'll track some down that I know are Miyukis and see how they do! Thanks very much!
Carol
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