Loom Help

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Emma.J wrote
on Oct 3, 2012 9:24 PM

Hello again!

I got myself a bead loom a few weeks ago and I'm slowly teaching myself how to use the thing. I did a project the other day that I am really happy with but I'm having so much difficulty with having to sew the warp threads back into the beadwork. My pieces are going to be quite big and there are just so many of them!!!

I have been hearing about these 'no warp' beading techniques, but I'm not sure how it is put into practice. Do all you more advanced loomers out there (Erin, Donna) know about this and do you think its a good method to use?

Thanks in advance!

Emma
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D.M.Z wrote
on Oct 4, 2012 1:16 AM

Emma, there is no better feeling than NOT having to deal with all those warp ends............and whether it is "no warps" which is Teresa Gutherie's method, some variation of that, or wait a bit for Erin's book and use her method. Whatever.............

For a regular loom there are some ways to make it easier depending on how you are going to finish your piede. If it will be something that will be backed or mounted, make several rows of "fabric" by just weaving your weft thread under and over and reversing the next row, do at least 6-10 rows and then either tape that fabric over or glue it and fold it to the back of the work and cover with your backing material. This is a great way to do nice wide bracelets.

You can make hanging straps out of the top threads by knotting clumps together a bit of a distance from the top row of weaving, run a rod through them and hang it up. The bottom warp threads can be fashioned into fringe.

Personally, though, I use a variation of "no warps" at the moment and I'm waiting (impatiently) for Erin's book to see if I will switch to her method. When I take my work off the loom, I have between 2 and 4 threads to deal with and that suits me as I am usually framing my work. Most looms can be converted to a "no warps" type of loom by replacing the divider springs with a solid dowel and sewing your first and last rows on, set the actual height of the piece you are making, and warp using the beads in the first and last rows to anchor your warps.

Glad you are liking loom work, it takes a while, but is totally rewarding............you go girl. Donna

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Posts 538
Emma.J wrote
on Oct 4, 2012 4:46 AM

Hey Donna,

I know! I want Erin's book out too!

When you say 'make several rows of "fabric"', what exactly do you mean by that? From the description you gave, my head is painting a picture of me taking a piece of fabric and putting it on the back of my piece. Then with my weft thread, I go around the back of the fabric and back up through my row of beads.. But how does that solve my warp thread problem? Or do I tape the warp threads to the fabric?

What sort of the 'no warps' variations are you using? I dont like the idea of my having a strip of sqaure stitch permanently stuck to my loom.. I have tried looking online, but they just don't make sense to me.

I am loving my loom - it's ALOT faster than doing it by hand with square stitch...

Emma
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