Peyote challenged!

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PennyM@15 wrote
on Jul 30, 2008 9:59 AM

I attended a class at a local bead shop to learn Peyote.  The kit had the smallest beads I have ever seen in my life and I didn't learn a thing.  I'd love to learn this stitch.  Is there a CD/DVD or really good book out there?  I just want to learn to make the stitch, flat, even, odd and tubular - and then I'll make something.  I get lost in the written directions.  It's always written as if they assume I've been doing this for years!

Thanks for your help!

PJM 

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Sheila H wrote
on Jul 30, 2008 12:53 PM

You might check the How To on this site. There are several things that I was not sure how to do but their instructions ( with drawings ) were fairly easy to follow. 

Everyone is really good about posting answers so there may be someone that can help you out. I would not even try as I don't routinely do that stitch as I simply string beads. 

 

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SCB1 wrote
on Jul 30, 2008 2:09 PM

 Here is a site that has some downloadable lesons on seveal different beading stitches. They are free just go into the free section found at the top of the home page.         http://www.bead-patterns.com/

The one thing I would suggest is to try and use cylinder beads and the bigger the better to learn. (cylinder beads are flat and allow the beads to sit better where they belong). After you learn you will be able to use the smallest of small beads. If you do want to use seed beads you can use a headpin or a peice of wire and put it through every other bead of the strung beads you put on at the very begining. (When you do peyote the first beads you put on will actuly be the first and second row of your design.) This will hold up the second row of beads so it is easier to see which bead you go through next. I hope I am making myself clear. If not please come back and many of us do peyote and maybe someone else can explain better, or have a better idea.

 

http://s279.photobucket.com/albums/kk159/queenpings/

 

Happy Beading!!

Sue,

Small-town USA. 

Michigan.

 

 

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Nemeton wrote
on Jul 31, 2008 3:40 AM

 Those are great tips - the wire/headpin technique is a really good one as it's the first few rows of any peyote piece that are the hardest.

I'd suggest you start with size 8 seed beads as it's then much easier to see what's going on and where the thread is going - the 'Matsuno' Japanese ones are my favourites for teaching as they have quite straight sides and fit together nicely. Once you've cracked it with size 8's you can move on to size 11's or cylinder beads and then to size 15's. And it's such a useful and versatile stitch that it's well worth learning!

There are instructions and diagrams in the back of most of the beading magazines that might help - or try Dustin Wedekind's 'Getting Started with Seed Beads' book, which has excellent diagrams and really clear explanations plus some nice simple projects.

And do come back and let us know how you're getting on! 

Lynn

 

My website: http://lynndavybeadwork.co.uk/

 

 

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HelenL@25 wrote
on Jul 31, 2008 7:02 PM

 Hi

I have a hard time understanding written instructions.

Go to www.firemountaingems.com and they have a place where they show the different stitches with video.  It is free so go there and check it out.

Thanks

ANN

 

 

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Cat wrote
on Jul 31, 2008 11:15 PM

Hello, I learned the Peyote by going to: www.beaducation.com.  Laura McCabe demonstrates the stitch; she's a great teacher!  The peyote stitch online training video(s) are free.  She demonstrates odd & even peyote...She explains it so well, that I was able to do on my first attempt.  Also, another good site for free online beading/training videos is: www.auntiesbeads.com.

I hope this helps.

Kindest regards,

Cat-

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on Aug 1, 2008 5:28 PM

When I first started doing the Gourd stitch, I always did it with #10 or #11 seed  beads.  If you must use that size or smaller, it is very helpful to use two colors, you can better see where the next bead goes.  I will no longer use any size larger than #8 for it -- I was recently useing Pony beads for doing a large diameter tube on a dowel, and was thououhly confused.  Starting with 2 colors of size 8, I was ok.  Guess it is how you learned it the first time.

You've gotten a lot of good advice here and a bit of dubious information -- 

At the American Indian Scouting Association's annual conference, I attended a beading class.  The man teaching it was an American Indian, fron the South West.  As a young man he had also been "adopted" by a Comanche family.  He was us teaching what most here would call a tubular peyote stitch.  He explained to us the difference between peyote and gourd stitches.  It is in the intended use!  As I will be using the round peyote stitch necklace to hold a cross I will wear while assisting in church services, it is propefly called Peyote Stitch.  If I were to give it to my wife to wear for everyday use, it would be called Gourd Stitch.


Also, a Chiricaua Apache I know fairly well, from the same organization, one day informed me he was "An American Indian, the Native americans are a bunch of newbies who came along in 1972."

BTW, the AISA was formed by American Indians, and non-indians.  Our Board of Directors shall be composed of 6 pesons from each group.  The chairman is always an American Indian.  [Per constitutionj and by-laws.]

Stan B.

Stan B.

Lakeland, MN

USA

Ignorance is curable; Stupidity has neither cure nor excuse.

wrote
on Aug 2, 2008 12:37 AM

You're exactly right Stan.  I think we all end up calling it peyote stitch because that's what all the books & magazines refer to it as, but for 90% of what we do, it really is gourd stitch.

I liked your comment about American Indians vs. Native Americans.  Politically correct strikes again!  It always strikes me as funny since the the only reason we say "Indians" in the first place is that Columbus thought he had discovered India!  Confused

 

 

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on Aug 2, 2008 7:45 AM

A Mayan in Guatemala told me they were caled Indians was because when Columbus saw them, he called them "En Dios" --in God.  He told me he liked the name.

Stan B.

 

Stan B.

Lakeland, MN

USA

Ignorance is curable; Stupidity has neither cure nor excuse.

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SCB1 wrote
on Aug 2, 2008 11:29 AM

Just found a great tutorial for peyote both odd and even count.  There are 4 videos to watch. This may help those that are still confused about the peyote stitch. Hope this fits the bill.

http://www.silverhilldesign.com/tutorials/PeyoteStitchTutor.html

PS. still don't know how to make a hot link. Some got a tutorial for that?Confused

PSS Jeni told me how to do it so so I came back and did an edit on this message. Now I know Thanks Jeni.Wink

Happy Beading!!

Sue,

Small-town USA. 

Michigan.

 

 

wrote
on Aug 3, 2008 2:18 AM

I finally figured out the hot link, Sue.  You have to highlight what you want to link, then right click and hit "copy".  When you highlight it the "link" in the tool bar will light up.  Click on it, then paste in the top section of the box that comes up.  You can choose to have it open in a new window or not.

 

 

 

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SCB1 wrote
on Aug 3, 2008 5:14 AM

Thank you JeniBig Smile I have always been computer challelngedConfused You tip on hot links did it.

So I edited the post I made with the tutorial link for peyote. It is two messages below.

Thank you

Thank you

Thank you

Happy Beading!!

Sue,

Small-town USA. 

Michigan.

 

 

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Radiance@3 wrote
on Aug 3, 2008 10:58 AM
Stan B, I'd never heard that! Thanks for that information... I'm just the tiniest bit Cherokee, and just SILLY proud of it! :-)

By the way, bead size and shape are indeed the key to learning peyote. Once you finally see it coming out the way it's supposed to, it clicks in your mind and you've got it forever -- but you really do have to get some large cylinders to catch onto it the first time.
Carol
wrote
on Aug 4, 2008 6:09 AM

Any time, Sue!  I was pretty proud of myself for figuring it out, since I'm a bit technology-challenged too.Hmm

 

 

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