Spider wire

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on May 23, 2011 5:12 AM

hi I just watched a youtube video on flat spiral stitch, thought I might try it out with bicone crystals and use Spider Wire what do you guys think of the wire the only one I could find was the 20 pound test weight is that thin enought to go through bicones more than once Hmm, plus can it be knotted if needs be. From what I know it is only new out here in NZ. I just love the way the flat spiral stitch looks when done with bicone crystals. Smile your opinions would be appriciated thanks.

 

 

regard southern lady

beady eyed Kiwi

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tpfrank wrote
on May 23, 2011 5:37 AM

Hi,

I looked up Spider wire on Google and from what I can see it is fishing line.  I could not see how thick the line is, but if you can thread it onto a beading needle size 10 or 12 then it should work okay.

All I can say is try it and let us know how it worked or not.  I also like the look of the bicone crystals in the flat spiral for the side beads, but I use the round beads in the middle only because that is what I had in my stash when I made my bracelet.

Post your work when you are done we would all like to see it.

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Editor
on May 23, 2011 7:59 AM

20 lb. test might be a little too thick to fit through the bicones, unless you're using larger (6mm or 8mm) bicones.  Personally, I don't use anything heavier than a 10 lb. FireLine or Wildfire unless I'm using metal seed beads, and then I'll use a 20 lb.  A 10 lb. test will give your piece some nice heft but will still allow for multiple thread passes through each bicone.  Hope this helps!

"Yesterday is history.  Tomorrow is a mystery.  But today is a gift.  That's why it is called the present." -Kung Fu Panda


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JSmaz wrote
on May 27, 2011 9:17 PM

6 lb Spiderwire is what I usually use and I've never had a problem with it.  I have some 12lb also which I occasionally use for heavy duty projects but it's much stiffer to work with.

Jeni

Oklahoma City

ArtFire Studio & blog  |  Gallery 

 

 

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g33kgirl59 wrote
on May 28, 2011 4:56 AM

I typically use Fireline - do you like Spiderwire better?

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JSmaz wrote
on May 28, 2011 7:18 AM

I use either one depending on the project.  I started with Spiderwire because it was much cheaper than Fireline, but I finally broke down and tried it to see what all the hype was about and it is definitely nice to work with.  I like that Spiderwire comes in a true clear color.

Jeni

Oklahoma City

ArtFire Studio & blog  |  Gallery 

 

 

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Posts 26
on May 29, 2011 2:22 AM

Hi  and thanks for all your comments, Ive found the fireline here but it only comes in a light lime green color and is really dear, so I may just give the spider wire a go. so thanks you all again Smile

 

regards southern lady

beady eyed Kiwi

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Posts 77
blackice1177 wrote
on Jul 12, 2011 12:32 PM

im currently using fireline myself 8 lb. the spiderwire does look like fishing line{take it from an old fisherman}. i haven't ever used it ,but judging from the test size your saying you wanting to use it might be a bit to much. drop it down to a 8-12 lb and i think you will be ok.

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D.M.Z wrote
on Jul 12, 2011 2:18 PM

We had someone using Spider a while back and in checking we found that it came in "monofilament" and maybe a braided line. Fireline, the one we use for beading is usually 6# test for average beads and is the braided type. The braided lines, no matter which you use, should be stronger than a monofilament which if it breaks is a single strand and you will lose your work. We did a lot of reading on the size of the line compared to the strength and decided to stick with Fireline.

I have some 8# which I am using up to make my delica swatches, but for my normal beading it is too stiff. I also have some 4# which is a bit light. After buying some of all the sizes I just don't think I can bead 6# for most general use. I'd go bigger for crystals as they can be sharp edged. I also use the 6# for warping my loom work as it gives me more confidence that it won't break or stretch and it won't be pierced when working the weft.

My Fireline from bead stores had less feet per reel and cost more. I have switched and buy it now from a fishing supply company......huge reels and not much more than the bead shop prices for a lot less line. See if you can find a fishing shop near you. If you want smaller spools, here it is sold as "ice fishing" spools as with ice fishing you are just dropping bait straight down, no casting involved. Donna

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RubyA@7 wrote
on May 20, 2012 1:22 PM

posts like this are helpful on and on through time.  i was looking for the same answers that you have given in your response.  i have a customer that wants to wear a crystal bicone bracelet everyday.  and it's a gentleman.  one bracelet i have made for him has broken after a couple of months use.  it was made with the heavier of the two fireline types available. 

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shanks wrote
on May 20, 2012 2:37 PM

Crystals are very hard on fireline. Try taking a bead reamer and make a couple of light turns on each end of the bicone. Just need to round the sharp edge of the hole. You will not see any difference in the quality of the bicone.  Fireline comes in many weights, you may want to try 40 or 60 lb test.

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