You Might Be a Wire Jewelry Artist If...

Aug 13, 2014

While I was previewing Susan Lenart Kazmer's latest video, Forge Wire Cages and and Other 3D Forms for Jewelry Making, I was struck by something she said: "I didn't even know I was a wire jewelry artist." Hmmm... She didn't realize she was a wire jewelry artist?

Could it be that my latest inclination towards jewelry making projects that use wire mean that I'm actually turning into such a creature? Could it be? I'll just take a look at this list of 5 things that may mean I'm turning into a wire jewelry artist.

1. You've stopped buying ear wires, eye pins, head pins, and other wire jewelry findings. Has it been a while since you've purchased jewelry findings like ear wires or eye pins? Could be that you're saving yourself a whole lot of money by making them yourself. Do you find yourself spending an entire afternoon making ear wires or head pins? You just might be a wire jewelry artist.

2. You hang pliers on the wall, instead of pictures or art. There's just no room on your table for all those pliers, so you do the only logical thing: you get a rack and hang them on the wall. Because, you know, it's like functional art. And it keeps them handy for when you're working on a jewelry making project. And because you need more room on your table for things like wire, and beads, and oh, wait, where's the micro torch?

3. You have six different types of wire cutters. One pair of wire cutters just doesn't, er, cut it anymore for you. You need cutters for heavy gauge wire, cutters for fine gauge wire, and cutters for memory wire. You have cutters from three different manufacturers. You need backups of each kind of wire cutter, too, because you never know when you'll encounter a particularly mean and vicious piece of heavy-gauge full-hard wire.

4. You know what a jig is, and you actually know how to use it. Enough said, right?

5. You own a micro torch. That's the clincher for me -- when I came home from Bead Fest Philadelphia last year and bought a micro torch, deftly camouflaging it with my hot glass tools and work space, I knew I had gone over to the Dark Side. Now, I make my own balled head pins and fused wire chain.

So, be honest with yourself: are you really a wire jewelry artist? Embrace your true identity! Love it! Own it! There's so much to love about making jewelry with wire!

Ready to be inspired and learn more about how you can take your wire jewelry making projects in a more artistic direction? You'll love Susan Lenart Kazmer's Forge Wire Cages and and Other 3D Forms for Jewelry Making, now available as an instant download or on DVD. You'll see how Susan creates fanciful, artistic cages for found objects using wire jewelry making techniques that include hammering, shaping, drilling, polishing, patina, and more. Get your copy of Forge Wire Cages and and Other 3D Forms for Jewelry Making and let your inner wire jewelry artist shine through!

Did I miss any of the warning signs? How did you know that you were actually a wire jewelry artist? Leave a comment here on the Beading Daily blog and share your thoughts with us!

Bead Happy,

Jennifer


Related Posts
+ Add a comment

Comments

wendygoerl wrote
on Aug 13, 2014 4:31 PM

Having/using jigs, micro torches, and/or  a variety of wire cutters could describe several artisans that don't deal with wire jewelry. For example,  "model horse tackmaker"  might even meet everything but #1.