Do You Love Peyote Stitch? You'll Love These 5 Peyote Stitch Tips!

Jul 2, 2014

Buckle Up Cuff by Carole Ohl, from the book Mastering Peyote Stitch by Melinda Barta
Whether I'm making a handmade beaded toggle, a cuff bracelet, or a beaded bezel, peyote stitch is the first bead-weaving stitch I turn to when I want to create a piece of beaded jewelry. This incredible versatile bead-weaving stitch is a favorite of beaders around the world, and for good reason! Peyote stitch has been around for thousands of years, including some early samples of this beading stitch that were found among the relics in the tombs of ancient Egypt. I put together five of my favorite peyote stitch blogs to share with you today that include tips for starting, stitching and shaping peyote stitch.

Easy-start solutions for flat peyote stitch. For me, sometimes the first few rows of flat peyote stitch can be the most difficult. Those spunky little beads want to just twist and wiggle out of position, and if you're working from a charted pattern, that can cause mistakes early on in your peyote stitch beading project. Using dummy rows, a needle or pin, or a set of peyote stitch starter cards can make starting your peyote stitch project smooth and easy!

Fiddle Dee Dee peyote stitch cuff by Carol Dean Sharpe
Reading a peyote stitch chart. I love making peyote stitch cuff bracelets using charted patterns. One of my favorite designers, Carol Dean Sharpe, is always coming out with new and beautiful patterns that keep me beading! But learning how to read those peyote stitch patterns was really hard for me, until I figured out a few tricks and put my understanding of the flat peyote stitch thread path to use. Once you get the hang of it, it's really a lot easier than you think.

Mastering tension in peyote stitch. Just like any other bead-weaving stitch, tension is so important for creating a durable, well-fitting piece of peyote stitch jewelry. Peyote stitch expert Melinda Barta shares her tips and techniques for keeping an even tension when working peyote stitch that should be used for any peyote stitch project.

Using peyote stitch to make better bezels. Oh, yes, if it's not moving, I'm going to make a peyote stitch bezel for it! Peyote stitch was how I learned how to make beaded bezels for things like gemstone cabochons, crystal rivolis, and found objects, and it's still one of my favorite techniques for capturing unusual objects, cabochons, and even beads in my beaded jewelry-making projects.

Learn how to do circular flat peyote stitch. Circular flat peyote stitch has a wealth of uses, from creating beautiful shaped beadwork to making backs for beaded bezels, or even just simple sculptural components for beaded earrings, necklaces, and bracelets. 

Want to learn more about how to use peyote stitch in your beaded jewelry-making projects? You'll love the new Bling Bracelet Project Kit. Including everything you need to make the beautiful Bling Bracelet project (using peyote stitch bezels around crystal beads) plus 2 digital eBooks and an instructional video from Jean Campell, it's a fabulous collection of some of our favorite beading resources that will keep your fingers busy for hours. Pre-order your Bling Bracelet Project Kit today, and enjoy enough beading projects to last you through the summer and into fall!

Have you discovered a new favorite way to use peyote stitch? Leave a comment here on the Beading Daily blog and share your peyote stitch adventures with us!

Bead Happy,

Jennifer


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Comments

Rose King wrote
on Jul 3, 2014 3:16 AM

I love Peyote, the neatness, the versatility and just sitting doing it.  I make wraps for small flashlights for the purse, ball point pens and Pilot G2 pens.  For the pens I use Delicas and size 11s for the flashlights.  Love Beadwork magazine, though the variety of beads/findings used are not readily available in England.