Use Basic Wire Jewelry Skills to Make a Fabulous Floral Collar!

Sep 17, 2012

A couple of months ago, Jewelry Making Daily's Tammy Jones wrote about a very cool stick pearl bracelet she made using wire and a metal cuff bracelet. When I saw her tutorial for her wire jewelry making project, I was inspired to finally use one of the awesome vintage brass collars I snagged from The Beadin' Path back in February at the Tucson Gem and Mineral shows!

There are so many things I love about this wire jewelry project. It was fast -- I finished it on my lunch break, in just under half an hour. It was easy -- just a little cutting and twisting of wire was all that I had to do to secure my vinyl flowers to the brass collar. And when I wore it that afternoon, I got so many comments and compliments! Even if you're a wire jewelry beginner, you can create one of these bold collars in your favorite colors using just a few materials and tools.

Materials:

  • Brass or copper collar (Beadin' Path)
  • Upcycled vinyl flower mix, 12 pieces (Beadin' Path)
  • 12" copper wire, 26 gauge
  • 4mm round Swarovski crystal bead in color to match or contrast with vinyl flowers

Tools:

  • Wire cutters
  • Needle nose pliers or chain nose pliers
  • Hole punch pliers (1.25mm hole)
  • Permanent marker

Step-by-step Instructions: 

Play with the vinyl flowers until you have an arrangement or grouping that is pleasing to you. I chose to make three groups of three flowers for my collar.
Using the hole punch pliers, punch holes in the center of each flower. Use a pair of embroidery scissors or your wire cutters to nip away any excess material that might be blocking the holes of your vinyl flowers.
Use the permanent marker and a ruler to mark the places on your brass collar where you want to place your bundles of vinyl flowers.
Using the hole punch pliers, make three holes in a triangle formation around each mark on the collar.
Cut a 5" piece of wire, and string one crystal bead. Push the bead to the center of the wire, then bend the wire around the crystal bead.
Insert both ends of the wire through the hole in each vinyl flower. Push everything together snugly.
Insert each end of wire into one of the holes you punched in your brass collar. You should still have one hole open for attaching the bundle of vinyl flowers.
On the back of the collar, twist the wires together tightly for about 3/4". Snip the excess wire.
Bend the twisted wire up through the empty third hole in the brass collar. Use your needle nose pliers if necessary to grasp and pull the twisted wire through to the front of the collar.
Bend the twisted wire against the front of the collar, under the vinyl flowers. It will remain hidden under here, and you can add a drop of glue if you'd like for extra security.
Add your remaining vinyl flower bundles in the same manner.

I still have one of those vintage brass collars left, and now I'm trying to figure out what to do with it. Because this project covered up most of the lovely hammered texture of the collar, I'm trying to think up a way that I can leave more of it exposed. Maybe I can use my wire jewelry skills to add small clusters of glass beads? Maybe I can punch holes along the bottom and add some wire fringe with more crystal beads? I've got a lot of thinking to do for this one!

Don't you just love it when you can turn your basic wire jewelry skills into something fabulous like this? Whenever I have a little success with my wire jewelry projects, I'm always inspired to go on to make something bigger and better! So when I'm feeling adventurous with my wire jewelry projects, I'll turn to the pages of Step By Step Wire Jewelry magazine for new ideas and inspiration. It just goes to show that a little bit of experience making wire jewelry can go a long way!

Subscribe to Step By Step Wire Jewelry and get a full year of wire jewelry tips, techniques, and projects that will have you get you working with wire in ways you never dreamed possible!

If you make this free wire jewelry project, take a picture and post it in our Reader Photo Gallery!

Bead Happy,

Jennifer

 

 

 


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