Beadwork Challenge, February 2014 – Win a Kit of Metal Components from Kabela Design

It's not very often that this beadweaver uses a metal component in my beading projects and beaded jewelry designs, but I was thrilled to see all the amazing designs in the February/March 2014 Beadwork challenge! The fabulous kit of metal jewelry-making components from Kabela Design was intricate, elegant, and a great opportunity for one Beadwork editor and three lucky readers to stretch their creative muscles a bit! Take a look at what project editor Kate Wilson did with her kit:

"I've been envisioning a large, bohemian-inspired, bead-embroidered pendant for some time now, and these metal pieces gave me the opportunity to explore that with more than just beads. I painted the kit pieces with Vintaj Patina Ink in aged bronze before stitching the window link, a brown labradorite faceted oval, and Czech two-hole flat squares, bricks, and daggers to my Ultrasuedecovered foundation. I used the smallest links to create two bails strung with a simple but heavy leather cord."

Feeling inspired? You could win this kit of metal components from Kabela Design for your very own! Just leave a comment on this post with a name for Kate's beaded necklace design before March 2, 2014 at 12 midnight CST. The editors of Beadwork magazine will choose the name they like best, and the winner will receive their very own kit, just like the one pictured here! (Due to customs regulations, this giveaway is only open to residents of the U.S.) Good luck!

Bead Happy,

Jennifer

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Jennifer VanBenschoten

About Jennifer VanBenschoten

Born in New Jersey in 1974, I escaped to the Adirondacks for the first time in 1995, making it my permanent home in 2000.  I have been interested in beads, buttons and making jewelry as long as I can remember.  It's probably my mother's fault - she was a fiber artist and crochet historian, and whenever she ordered supplies from one mail order source, she would order a huge bag of assorted buttons and beads for me and my sister!    

239 thoughts on “Beadwork Challenge, February 2014 – Win a Kit of Metal Components from Kabela Design

  1. Taino Pride, The indigenous tribes from the Puerto Rican Island that first greeted Columbus as he was traveling through the islands. 🙂 My grandmother is Taino and grandfather Cherokee, we have a lot of pride.

  2. After reading everyone else’s comments I got the sense that for most it has an ethnic or multicultural feel/look to it. I’d have to agree with this. This led me to look up the word bohemian. Meaning # 1: anyone from the Kingdom of Bohemia, now known as the Czech Republic. Meaning #2 (and most commonly used): Derived from the french word referring to “gypsies” or a socially unconventional person especially involved in the arts. I could play on words like: Bohemian Chic or Gypsy Chic. But, there’s a story to this piece. The “person” who owns it has been around the world. Picked up some beads here, a component there, eventually putting them together. So call it: World Traveler or better, yet The Traveler’s Piece.

  3. After reading everyone else’s comments I got the sense that for most it has an ethnic or multicultural feel/look to it. I’d have to agree with this. This led me to look up the word bohemian. Meaning # 1: anyone from the Kingdom of Bohemia, now known as the Czech Republic. Meaning #2 (and most commonly used): Derived from the french word referring to “gypsies” or a socially unconventional person especially involved in the arts. I could play on words like: Bohemian Chic or Gypsy Chic. But, there’s a story to this piece. The “person” who owns it has been around the world. Picked up some beads here, a component there, eventually putting them together. So call it: World Traveler or better, yet The Traveler’s Piece.

  4. It’s so acient Middle or South American looking! Could be Southwestern, too! I really do love the look! I think I would call it 1) Aztec Alure or 2) Mystic Mayan Royalty

  5. I would name this Aztalan Princess because it reminds me of a precious piece that might be found in the burial mound of the Mississippian princess’s tomb in Aztalan, WI.

  6. My first thought when I saw this necklace was that it looked like a koala. With the big oval brown nose, and the fuzzy ears sticking out, a koala was the first thing that came to mind. I would call it Koala with Sunglasses.

  7. This is a lovely design. I feel inspired to use items from my stash to copy this idea, with my own twist
    .
    I would call it “Under Blue Sky” or “Under Blue Skies”.

  8. The variety of components brought up multiple images for me, but with an overall native Indian theme. The tiles represented fish scales. The daggers had a feather look. The focal stone showed strength. The piece as a whole made me think of the lionfish as it is the only creature with similar characteristics. Therefore I would name the piece, the Lionfish Amulet.

  9. “Plumed Serpent” is my choice of name for this beautiful necklace.
    It immediately reminded me of photos I’ve seen depicting Quetzalcoat, the serpent god of the pre-columbian tiibes of Mexico.

  10. “Plumed Serpent” is my choice of name for this beautiful necklace. It immediately reminded me of photos I’ve seen depicting Quetzalcoat, the serpent god of the pre-columbian tiibes of Mexico.
    I congratulate Kate Wilson on her unique design!

  11. “The Feathered Serpent” is the name I am submitting.

    Mesoamerican tribes such as the Inca, Mayan & Aztec had a prominent supernatural entity or deity as part of their religion that was a feathered serpent. That’s what I thought of when I first saw this necklace.

  12. Each day the turtle lifted his head spying on the eagles, the hawks and the doves that flew and glided so swiftly in the sky. Each night the turtle would dream of flying….

    I name the necklace turtle feathers.

  13. Each day the turtle lifted his head spying on the eagles, the hawks and the doves that flew and glided so swiftly in the sky. Each night the turtle would dream of flying….

    I name the necklace turtle feathers.

  14. Every day the turtle treads through the rocks which he resembles seeing the swiftness of the birds streaking through the sky. Every night the turtle dreams of the eagles, doves, sparrows and hawks. As the turtle traverses his earthbound plains, he finds vestiges of the sky. As feathers waifer downward the turtle gathers them to his shell. He too can roam the sky.

    I name the necklace turtle feathers

  15. Every day the turtle treads through the rocks which he resembles seeing the swiftness of the birds streaking through the sky. Every night the turtle dreams of the eagles, doves, sparrows and hawks. As the turtle traverses his earthbound plains, he finds vestiges of the sky. As feathers waifer downward the turtle gathers them to his shell. He too can roam the sky.

    I name the necklace turtle feathers

  16. Vision Serpent Amulet.
    This reminds me of Aztec or Mayan jewelry. It makes me thinks of a Quetzalcoatl egg dreaming of the winged serpent god that he will become.

  17. I think “eye of the eagle” is appropriate. the brown bead just jumps out as if its looking at me. and the daggers make it look as if its in flight. either way its beautiful. edna campione

  18. This is truly interesting. It reminds me of “The Shaman’s Dream”. It was a picture, in a dream cloud above a dancing Shaman, of a buffalo running on the plains. It was a beautiful picture with the same colors you used in the beads.

  19. I suggest calling the piece “Ode to Quetzalcoatl” (the feathered serpent god attributed to be the forth creator of humans) or for an easier name to pronounce, how about “Aztec Summer”.

    The piece reminds me of Mesoamerican art; especially the ancient fabrics and some of the jade and feather jewelry pieces. There appears to be both Mayan and Aztec influences in this piece; however, I feel that it is more Aztec than Mayan. I, therefore, suggest an Aztec name.

  20. I absolutely love getting Beading daily’s newsletters every day. The way it gives me ideas, is absolutely amazing. I have been sick lately so can only do a few things a day without spending all my energy or time. About winning this metal kit, it would be absolutely wonderful to win, because I have ran out of metal endings, and even some charms. I like the idea of how she used the jump rings to hold here pendant onto the cording, never thought or seen that sone before. And the way those end beads are, they look like feathers instead of beads. Well, there is my comment. Look forward to your next email. Thanks!!! for everything!

  21. Since Labradorite is the “Mystic Stone” that deepens meditation and serenity and is combined with the amazing beadwork..
    this necklace would be named :
    Mystic Serenity Spirit

  22. I would call this necklace “Ancient Relic”.

    To me, it has this old lost treasure look to it.

    I think that this is a beautiful piece, and I love the metal components of it. You don’t really see enough metal in beadweaving.

  23. When I was 11 we took a trip out west with our family. It was the first time this Mid-Western girl had ever been west of the Mississippi river. I vividly remember my uncle taking us to a cabin on Lake Tenkiller in Oklahoma. The water was so clear and blue, we could see past our feet! Oklahoma history was also rich with the history of Native Americans. This necklace totally brought back all of those memories for me! I felt the deep, clear blue of Lake Tenkiller, and the tribal influences of the Native American in the fringe-like daggers. My name for this necklace is “Spirit of Lake Tenkiller”.

  24. Congratulations to Colleen Carter, who won the Feb/Mar14 Beadwork Challenge Naming Contest with her submission of “Lionfish Amulet” for Kate Wilson’s necklace. Colleen won an identical kit of beads to the one used in this challenge, from Kabela Design. Thanks for playing! ~Lavon Peters, managing editor, Beadwork

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